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Massive Layoffs At a Bleeding Regent/Here Media. Advocate Folding Into An Insert?

advocaterain

Just days after a glowing profile in the Dallas Morning News of Paul Colichman and Stephen Jarchow’s Regent/Here Media comes word from inside the company: it’s a sinking ship.

Multiple sources tell Queerty Colichman and Jarchow (pictured below) have gutted The Advocate‘s masthead in an attempt to stem the mag’s bleeding cash reserves. A money loser when Here Media bought it from PlanetOut Partners, they’ve been unable to turn things around since acquiring the title.

On Wednesday, an estimated 13 staffers were let go, including the magazine’s managing editor and 15-year veteran John Jameson was axed, along with art director Craig Edwards (his less experienced deputy was given the job, for much less cash), associate photo editor Meghan Quinn, and copy editor Teresa Morrison. On the business side, associate publisher Mike Phelps and production manager Brian Lindsey were let go. (We’re told Lindsey “sent out a naked picture of himself with a sock over his happy parts” upon receiving the news. Send it in if you have it, please.) UPDATE: We scored the photo! It’s here.

And here’s the news we’re hearing (but have not confirmed with the company): The Advocate will cease publication as a standalone magazine offered on the newsstand. Instead, it’ll be poly-bagged as an insert of the company’s fashion and lifestyle glossy Out. If true, it’s unclear whether current subscribers will still receive a standalone version of the magazine or have their subscriptions swapped for Out. UPDATE: We’re told that moving forward, The Advocate will, at least initially, appear as a 32-to-36-page-ish poly-bagged insert “accompaniment” to Out, though it may remain a “separate” book from Out. It will not be sold on the newsstand, and it’s unclear whether new subscriptions to Advocate will be accepted, or whether they’ll be transferred to Out by default.

Meanwhile, at HIV Plus — which we’re told actually makes cash, because of all the Big Pharma ads — three members of the magazine’s tiny full-time staff were fired: managing editor Bob Adams, art director Raine Bascos, and fact checker Angela Bervidoro.

But if you’re still employed at Regent? The news isn’t very good for you, either. Human resources director Christin Dennis told staffers on a Sept. 25 conference all that employee payroll deductions for health-care insurance double immediately, and senior staffers would see even higher increases. It’s the only way Regent can “meet it’s financial targets,” Dennis said.

colichmanjarchow

Some freelance and contract writers and photogs, meanwhile, have gone unpaid for months; some have threatened to stop working entirely until their balances are paid. (Don’t expect that to happen quickly: Editorial operations coordinator Rob Chin, who handled payments, was let go this week.)

While unfortunate, none of this downsizing is terribly surprising, and it’s hard to fault Regent/Here for what is, frankly, a shitty marketplace.

After laying off digital staffers earlier this year, the gay media giant continues to lose cash in almost every department. (Its film division, Regent Releasing, does generate positive cash flow, we’re told.) And gay print media certainly isn’t immune to the overall print downturn; advertisers and readers are fleeing, and the ad dollars that flow online aren’t enough to make up the difference.

Regent/Here’s porn unit, Unzipped Media, already shuttered two titles (err, they went “quarterly”), leaving only Unzipped. And HereTV, the company’s pay-TV service, may be “available” in 54 million homes, but an infinitesimal fraction of them actually subscribe to the $8/month network. (HereTV pays very little for its programming, however, which means it has lower costs than other networks.)

But even if Regent is helpless to the market climate, certainly they’re going about layoffs in the nicest way possible? Well …

At a company party in September to celebrate employee anniversaries, Jarchow joked about two honorees who were missing that day — because they had been “terminated.” Get it? (This, from a guy who had the company hire his daughter Boo when it acquired PlanetOut Partner’s LPI Media divison last year. Yes, she still has her job.)

As for Colichman? He “continues his useless prancing around the office, prattling about how awesome his ‘five-star’ websites are because they now contain video,” says one source with first-hand knowledge of the situation. (Worth noting: Colichman last month fired one of the company’s only videographers.) Those five-star websites he’s talking about include Gay.com, an excellent domain name for anyone in gay media, but one Regent has yet to effectively monetize. With most of Gay.com’s cash coming from chat subscribers, it continues to be plagued by technical issues and losing market share to sites like Manhunt.net.

This isn’t about stomping on the graves of Regent/Here staffers — who, if they’re good writers, should give Queerty a shout — but for a niche market (gay media) that’s already been heavily consolidated under Colichman and Jarchow’s roof, it’s indicative of what the future looks like: more doom and gloom. There’s no reason to celebrate here, even from a competitor’s standpoint: Bad news for The Advocate doesn’t (necessarily) mean good news for online properties like Queerty. And under editorial director Aaron Hicklin, both Out and The Advocate have become better publications that, dare we say, are worth reading.

It is curious, then, that Regent scored such a creampuff piece from a fellow dying publication just as they were firing a huge chunk of personnel.

(We called and left messages for Here Media publicity staffers Mark Umbach and Luis Lopez, as well as Here Media chief Colichman, and Regent general manager Stephen Macias, and are awaiting a response. We’ll let you know what we hear, if anything.)

UPDATE: Hilariously, Mr. Macias chose not to respond to us directly, by email or telephone call, but sent this letter (addressed to our edit director David Hauslaib) to the blog Kenneth In The 212. Macias responded in the comments, though because of a comments spam filter created after hate-filled rhetoric was repeatedly submitted from IP addresses belonging to Regent, his reply was not immediately posted; it’s since been published below. We’d offer a line-by-line translation, but commenter Mike beat us to it. Though we do love Macias’s new term “print expression” to refer to a magazine.

Dear David,

I wanted to take a moment to speak to the inaccuracies of your story and to the strength of The Advocate brand.

Clearly, 2009 has been one of the most challenging economic periods for all businesses in the United States. Moving strong, lean businesses forward in 2010 requires that business models adapt. This company cares very much about the history of the most important LGBT national news brand and is making careful and thoughtful decisions to ensure its survival and to position it for growth. We are reorganizing departments to make that happen. That said, we are all very grateful for the work our departing staff members contributed‹just as we are of those who continue to work with the company.

First, The Advocate staff has not been “gutted” as you write. We are, however, making strategic and sometimes difficult staff changes in order to support all iterations of The Advocate brand. The print expression (which will vary in size from month to month as it always has), will continue on its monthly schedule. Our website (which has quadrupled its traffic in the past 16 months) will be relaunched early next year with enhanced technology that will add dimension to the breaking news and features stories our editors and reporters are already delivering on a several-times-a-day basis.

So what does that mean for The Advocate reader? We’ll still ask tough questions of the White House press secretary around issues like DADT, we’ll still deliver online live video coverage of key events like today’s passage of the Ryan White Care Act, and we’ll report critical news around topics like the Defense of Marriage Act — only now you’ll get more of it (in a more timely manner) than ever before.

The Advocate brand will also expand, as previously announced, to include a monthly hour-long television magazine that will be broadcast on our sister brands here! TV and Gay.com and of course on Advocate.com. We are currently in production, and on schedule, for the show’s February launch. Modeled after CBS’s tremendously esteemed 60 Minutes, this program will explore the critical issues of the day through the Advocate lens.

All Advocate subscribers will continue to receive their print editions of the magazine, and editor in chief Jon Barrett (who is still employed with the company despite an earlier Queerty report that he had been fired) has been promoted to Advocate editorial director overseeing all expressions of extensions of the brand.

With regard to HIV Plus magazine, it will continue to be published under the leadership of editor in chief Michael Edwards. In fact, while Queerty was propagating this inaccurate story, our staff was working closely with AIDS Project Los Angeles in preparation for a fundraiser for the group (in conjunction with HIV Plus) at the home of our CEO Paul Colichman.

Speaking of Mr. Colichman and our chairman, Stephen Jarchow. These two men have invested a great deal of time, energy, and resources not only into building a vibrant, collaborative workplace but into rebuilding, sustaining, and growing some of our community’s most important brands. Mr. Jarchow has passed on his commitment to the LGBT community to his lesbian daughter, Boo, who in addition to working at The Advocate and on Shewired.com, was an instrumental young leader in organizing last month’s March on Washington. I hope other young people follow her good example as we all need to part of the solution for LGBT equality. One final note on your personal attacks: Mr. Colichman takes great umbrage to the characterization that he prances around the office; he pictures himself much more as an optimistic skipper. We have that from “multiple sources.” [Ed: Noted.]

Here Media continues to evolve and integrate its many properties with care and respect in challenging times. In fact, The Advocate — throughout its four decades of service — is a great model when it comes to embracing change. It began in 1967 as a mimeographed newsletter, evolved into a broadsheet newspaper, transitioned into a tabloid, and then blossomed in its current glossy iteration. The Advocate will continue to grow — especially online and on air — while maintaining its high standards in print.

On Wednesday, thousands of Advocate readers went to Advocate.com to watch live video coverage of long-overdue passage of the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act. No other news site in the world thought the moment was important enough to cover live, but The Advocate did — and the Advocate will continue to do so.

Stephen Macias
Senior Vice President, Regent Media, LLC

By:           editor editor
On:           Oct 30, 2009
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  • 116 Comments
    • Lance Rockland
      Lance Rockland

      That is terrible news. The Advocate has been the leading national gay publication for 40 years.

      I can’t imagine it disappearing.

      Oct 30, 2009 at 4:50 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Keith Kimmel
      Keith Kimmel

      I wonder when people are going to realize that ALL print media is a dying industry. Newspapers, magazines, books (I have owned two small publishing companies – shuttered both as I could see the writing on the wall) and the list goes on. The future is in new media, the printing press is obsolete.

      Oct 30, 2009 at 4:54 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Keith Kimmel
      Keith Kimmel

      No. 1 · Lance Rockland

      “I can’t imagine it disappearing.”

      I hope it doesn’t disappear completely too, but if it does, it will be their own fault (read: mismanagement) for not getting away from the paper soon enough. They should have went online only several years ago. Fact of the matter is people don’t want to buy a paper publication anymore. The hassle and the waiting is just too much for todays impatient, have it all now youth. With all that content streaming to their iPhones, whats the point of a printed publication? Its irrelevant before they even get done setting the type. Not to worry, they’ll lay in a graveyard of plenty of company (other publishers – i.e. daily newspapers) that failed to change from the printed page to the electronic page quick enough.

      The recording industry almost missed the mark too, but they saw that consumers were going to stop buying CDs and while iTunes wasn’t their ideal distribution medium, they were smart enough to realize they had better get on board and make the change now rather than wait their way into oblivion. Video killed the radio star and then Napster (after giving birth to its law-abiding cousin, iTunes) is going to kill the market for recorded music (CDs, etc).

      Oct 30, 2009 at 5:02 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • LoveMoby
      LoveMoby

      This is awful news. I enjoy The Advocate and have for many years. I sincerely hope it doesnt disappear. :-(

      Oct 30, 2009 at 5:17 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • scott ny'er
      scott ny'er

      @keith
      Yes. It is a dying medium. Print, that is. But what of WSJ.com and ConsumerReports.com? Subscription-based news media. They seem successful, no?

      =======
      It is sad to hear about the Advocate. But Keith brings up a point, I wouldn’t really subscribe to the Advocate. Due to the internet, I can get most info I need regarding LGBT issues. What might be sad, is those peeps who don’t have a computer or do not live in Metro areas. (I can easily hop down the the GayCenter to get other info or any other LGBT venue in Manhattan.)

      And money is tight nowadays, especially with peeps being laid off (ie. me) and 401k $$$ looking like crap.

      Oct 30, 2009 at 6:20 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Joe Moore
      Joe Moore

      I know a lot of people who read blogs all the time, have iPhones so they stay connected, and love new media.

      But they all have a copy of The Advocate at their house. They al subscribe or pick it up at the Newsstand. It’s nice to be able to sit down without the glow of the screen and read an article, well-written, and informative. So what if it’s not something that happened 5 minutes ago, that’s not the point.

      I’m sad that they are taking it away. I would hate to see such an iconic piece of our struggle fade.

      Oct 30, 2009 at 6:25 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Greenpoint Guy
      Greenpoint Guy

      This article is a joke. You fully acknowledge that Regent is working in a “shitty marketplace” and that Queerty is up against the same challenges. Therefore, you’ve got to understand Regent’s struggles. Why, then, you are such so bitchy? Why so personal? Why so begrudging in your acknowledgment of their editorial quality? Did they fire YOUR ass at some point? Your bitchiness takes away your credibility.

      Oct 30, 2009 at 6:29 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Qjersey
      Qjersey

      Great I got screwed out of the balance of my Genre subscription and now I’ll get screwed out of the balance of my Advocate subscription. Renew my subscription to OUT, not!

      Thanks big business for siphoning off funds and driving another established brand into the ground.

      Oct 30, 2009 at 7:46 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • terrwill
      terrwill

      FUCK-SHIT-DAMM-PISS-HELL……….My usual verbal response to really shitty news………To me it is inconceviable that the Advocate could actually shit the bed. I don’t understand what the hell is happening. I guess I am one of the dying breed that actually likes to have a publication in my hands and read it. Sorry the online experience just doesn’t cut it for news and mags for me. And The Advocate has been around since the days of Stonewall……..I have a sub for the mag and am more pissed that rightwing-nutbags like Rush Windbag can make zillions off his freakin ties and mugs while the Gays can’t even support a magazine that has so damm much history……..very,very sad day for the Gays. And unfortunately most of us won’t even realize how sad this actually is……………. :-(

      Oct 30, 2009 at 7:58 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • J. Clarence
      J. Clarence

      This is very sad news. I mean there is the Edge network, but the Advocate was just top-notch.

      I still like magazines, but in the age of new media too many print organizations had this false idea that they can ride out of the storm.

      Do we know if the website will be taken down as well?

      Oct 30, 2009 at 8:11 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • toasted
      toasted

      Why didn’t they give it to someone who could afford to keep it going? It’s not a very responsible company that would fold a historical and important journalism vehicle like The Advocate. It hurts our community at this time of so much change to suffer such an enormous loss.

      Shame on Regent.

      Oct 30, 2009 at 8:19 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • RS
      RS

      I was one of the casualties nine months ago (along with the vast majority of people left at PlanetOut Inc.) just days after the acquisition was announced. While I might have expected that this news in theory would give me a certain vindictive schadenfreude, it doesn’t. It just makes me even sadder.

      Oct 30, 2009 at 8:26 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Nell
      Nell

      HERE IS WHY PRINT MEDIA IS MORE IMPORTANT>>>>

      What you put into printed words must be something you are absolutely certain about, can stand behind, will earn confidence, is sound, solid…it is final.

      Blogs are eternally reactive, stupid, wrong and quick to pull a trigger on a story that is not at all accurate, basically putting shit online and calling it ‘news’…blogs can never replace thoughtful journalism.

      Websites with a print edition behind them are much more credible than a queen with a key board and internet connection….get a grip, ladies…this is a disaster for our community.

      Oct 30, 2009 at 8:27 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Keith Kimmel
      Keith Kimmel

      No. 5 · scott ny’er
      @keith

      “Yes. It is a dying medium. Print, that is. But what of WSJ.com and ConsumerReports.com? Subscription-based news media. They seem successful, no?”

      Yeah, they are. Very much so.

      I see both sides. But I don’t really like where that is going. One of the nice things about a printed publication was that there was a historical record that stood the test of time. Take a magazine like the Advocate. Some libraries here get it. They keep it. People who are heavily into politics (like me) get it and keep the back issues. If the Advocate website disappears tomorrow, I still have my back issues and the info in them. With an online only publication, the website goes away and so does the info. Publications like The Advocate act almost as scientific journals in some ways, preserving our collective knowledge on our area of interest (queer rights).

      You see, the great thing about the Internet is that anyone – even of very modest financial means – can have a voice. That’s also the biggest problem with the Internet. Blogs and online publications are judged by many in terms of legitimacy based on how they look. Few online publications have been around long enough to establish themselves as reputable outlets of news. I’m excluding news sites that are just the online version of a print news outlet, like usatoday.com. All of these blogs, which anyone can start – and anyone can make a legitimate looking one by shelling out a couple of grand to a web designer – blur the line between legitimate news, commentary, rumor and outright lies and bullshit.

      The lines have become blurred because blogs tend to not follow any kind of fact checking processes (its accurate because goddamn it, the editor/reporter said it is!) and I worry that we are going to be left with two options for news. The “free news” which will consist of the blogospehere and a few paid subscription sites which the average person will not be able to afford to adequately use. Because to adequately be educated on a subject, you need to read multiple reports and decide for yourself.

      Who can afford a subscription to more than two or three sites at the prices they charge (about as much as a porn site – $20 to $40 a month) that would allow you to get 10-12 different views? We know that most news outlets have their biases (and if you have ever dealt directly with the media as I have, its even more evident – I know exactly which reporter at which outlet to call when I want to get something on the news here) and its left to the reader to read multiple items to try and peace together the real story.

      Then lets say News Site R writes a story about some homophobic comments a local official makes, but you only subscribe to Newssites X, Y and Z. X, Y and Z never cover it due to bias. You’d never know, and it would never turn up in a Google search on that official because paid media sites always lock search engines out.

      This is all important, when you consider how ignorant of queer history a disturbing portion of the queer population is. I fear we are, collectively, are going to lose alot of our “institutional memory” and become dumbed down as a result of all this consolidation.

      Oct 30, 2009 at 8:49 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • ccb
      ccb

      I’m sad The Advocate is shutting down. :( I do read news online – but that’s my daily news, the equivalent of watching Katie Couric or getting a daily paper. I read magazines in print for in-depth coverage. I, too, like to have the tangible paper in front of me, maybe save important or sentimental issues for the future, rather than see it all disapear into the ether after a few days of being posted. I hope they continue at least for a little while – I’m not interested in Out. The Advocate was (mostly) about NEWS. Out is about pop culture and other fluff. Not interested. :( Maybe they’ll have a goodbye issue, at least.

      Oct 30, 2009 at 9:02 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Joel
      Joel

      Many people have already commented on the death of print and many niche publications are dying. Also many people say they only get news on gay issues and most news from the internet. But what people fail to understand is that blogs and online news websites only exist to spread the hard work of the printed words that are in this “dying media”. Without the printed press Matt Drudge has nothing to link to. With out the Advocate and many other local gay newspapers sites like Queerty and others have nothing to link to. Most blogs and internet net news sites source from the online versions of the newspapers/magazine and then just toss up some commentary. Without the NYTimes, Newsweek, Advocate and others they’ll be no online news.

      Personally I read my Advocate when it comes in the mail. Yeah usually half the stories have been covered online but usually not as in depth, The internet has speed but with that speed comes the fact that readers move on and only read the paragraph and a few comments. I was really hoping the Advocate would expand into more in depth pieced and follow up on the quick hits that spring up on the blogs. But alas the economy hit first.

      Oct 30, 2009 at 9:03 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Daniel
      Daniel

      At least that explains why it abruptly stopped arriving in the mail.

      Oct 30, 2009 at 9:04 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Kropotkin
      Kropotkin

      R.I.P. Publishing industry. I feel bad for them, we’re getting hammered at the newspapers (my industry) as well. It’s not the apocalypse as many predict, but many are not going to be left after the great shake out is over.

      “Without the printed press Matt Drudge has nothing to link to. With out the Advocate and many other local gay newspapers sites like Queerty and others have nothing to link to. Most blogs and internet net news sites source from the online versions of the newspapers/magazine and then just toss up some commentary. Without the NYTimes, Newsweek, Advocate and others they’ll be no online news.”

      Word. But I think the question is not: “will print survive?” rather it is “will journalism as we know it survive; and what will be the new business model?” Sitting around and moaning about the blogs isn’t going to accomplish much.

      Oct 30, 2009 at 9:18 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Lady Ga-Gasp
      Lady Ga-Gasp

      This *news* isn’t much of a surprise to anyone who has a good vantage point over the LA scene, and if you knew some of the players here, you certainly wouldn’t be a bit surprised.

      But there are also great people caught up in all this, not the least of which the faithful customers across the country. My guess is that they will find something else useful to do, expressing themselves as journalists, or finding great journalism that they know is true.

      News, the close cousin of our currently overrated gossip, finds its way up through to the light and air like the damn fabulous weed of the brain that it is.

      You just can’t tamp down curiosity, or a good story, or the people who tell it, or even kill it with an overdose. Or the people who read it. It just comes back. Reborn, in another form.

      Oct 30, 2009 at 9:25 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • J. Clarence
      J. Clarence

      I think people are beating up on bloggers a bit too much here. While it is obvious that many blog authors such as myself get their references from other sites like The Advocate I think it is a stretch to blame bloggers as the catalyst for the death of the gay print media. All blogging is the dissemination of news to a specific audience, your readers. Plus it is not as if what ever was on Queerty was not readily available a click away on The Advocate’s own website for the public to see. It would be a completely different story if Queerty and others were ripping off entire stories from The Advocate and marking it as it’s own. (There are websites that do that, but they generally do not attract a sizable share that would take away from The Advocate’s bottom.)

      Print media has largely failed to adopt an effective revenue generating source in the internet age, and market forces had their way.

      There will always be a need for journalists, and the death, or decline to be precise of print media is not going to kill that profession. Will it shrink it? Most definitely, but in some cases that is what needs to happen in order for the industry to reform itself.

      With The Advocate folding (if that indeed turns out to be the case) it potentially leaves a slot for another entrepreneur to capture the interest of those that want the objectives with budget that takes into account the new means of which media is processed.

      The larger question we have to ask is whether or not there is even a legitimate niche for a gay oriented news magazine, that can generate an interest (in economic downstairs) as well as establish a price patrons are willing to pay for. It is not impossible, The Advocate has just been a company that has apparently been unable to find out how to do it.

      Oct 30, 2009 at 9:30 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • hardmannyc
      hardmannyc

      They could save money by consolidating operations in NYC. I hate to say that because it means people relocating or leaving their jobs, but the fact is, the Advocate was founded pre-Stonewall in LA and has remained there, but most of the business and all of the ad, promotion & marketing have moved to 17th Street, as well as all editorial except the Advocate. And Out has had some good features lately, like the one about the transgender doctor in Colorado, amidst the fluff.

      Oct 30, 2009 at 10:21 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • stephen Macias
      stephen Macias

      Dear David,

      I wanted to take a moment to speak to the inaccuracies of your story and to
      the strength of The Advocate brand.

      Clearly, 2009 has been one of the most challenging economic periods for all
      businesses in the United States. Moving strong, lean businesses forward in
      2010 requires that business models adapt. This company cares very much about
      the history of the most important LGBT national news brand and is making
      careful and thoughtful decisions to ensure its survival and to position it
      for growth. We are reorganizing departments to make that happen. That said,
      we are all very grateful for the work our departing staff members
      contributed‹just as we are of those who continue to work with the company.

      First, The Advocate staff has not been “gutted” as you write. We are,
      however, making strategic and sometimes difficult staff changes in order to
      support all iterations of The Advocate brand. The print expression (which
      will vary in size from month to month as it always has), will continue on
      its monthly schedule. Our website (which has quadrupled its traffic in the
      past 16 months) will be relaunched early next year with enhanced technology
      that will add dimension to the breaking news and features stories our
      editors and reporters are already delivering on a several-times-a-day basis.
      So what does that mean for The Advocate reader? We’ll still ask tough
      questions of the White House press secretary around issues like DADT, we’ll
      still deliver online live video coverage of key events like today’s passage
      of the Ryan White Care Act, and we’ll report critical news around topics
      like the Defense of Marriage Act,only now you’ll get more of it (in a more
      timely manner) than ever before.

      The Advocate brand will also expand, as previously announced, to include a
      monthly hour-long television magazine that will be broadcast on our sister
      brands here! TV and Gay.com and of course on Advocate.com. We are currently
      in production, and on schedule, for the show’s February launch. Modeled
      after CBS’s tremendously esteemed 60 Minutes, this program will explore the
      critical issues of the day through the Advocate lens.

      All Advocate subscribers will continue to receive their print editions of
      the magazine, and editor in chief Jon Barrett (who is still employed with
      the company despite an earlier Queerty report that he had been fired) has
      been promoted to Advocate editorial director‹overseeing all expressions of
      extensions of the brand.

      With regard to HIV Plus magazine, it will continue to be published under the
      leadership of editor in chief Michael Edwards. In fact, while Queerty was
      propagating this inaccurate story, our staff was working closely with AIDS
      Project Los Angeles in preparation for a fundraiser for the group (in
      conjunction with HIV Plus) at the home of our CEO Paul Colichman.

      With regards to rising health care costs in the United States, our company
      does not stand alone in the challenge of managing how best to provide the
      best possible health care to our 150 + employees. Sharing that cost in order
      to maintain that high quality of health care is of course dificult, although
      not having health care benefits like 46 million Americans is truly the
      bigger problem.

      Speaking of Mr. Colichman and our chairman, Stephen Jarchow. These two men
      have invested a great deal of time, energy, and resources not only into
      building a vibrant, collaborative workplace but into rebuilding, sustaining,
      and growing some of our community’s most important brands. Mr. Jarchow has
      passed on his commitment to the LGBT community to his lesbian daughter, Boo,
      who in addition to working at The Advocate and on Shewired.com, was an
      instrumental young leader in organizing last month’s March on Washington. I
      hope other young people follow her good example as we all need to part of
      the solution for LGBT equality. One final note on your personal attacks: Mr.
      Colichman takes great umbrage to the characterization that he prances around
      the office; he pictures himself much more as an optimistic skipper. We have
      that from “multiple sources.”

      Here Media continues to evolve and integrate its many properties with care
      and respect in challenging times. In fact, The Advocate‹throughout its four
      decades of service‹ is a great model when it comes to embracing change. It
      began in 1967 as a mimeographed newsletter, evolved into a broadsheet
      newspaper, transitioned into a tabloid, and then blossomed in its current
      glossy iteration. The Advocate will continue to grow,especially online and
      on air,while maintaining its high standards in print.

      On Wednesday, thousands of Advocate readers went to Advocate.com to watch
      live video coverage of long-overdue passage of the Matthew Shepard and James
      Byrd Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act. No other news site in the world thought
      the moment was important enough to cover live, but The Advocate did‹and the
      Advocate will continue to do so.

      Sincerest Regards,

      Stephen F. Macias
      EVP, General Manager
      Here Media

      Oct 30, 2009 at 10:33 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Give me a fucking break
      Give me a fucking break

      when qtv went down, the advocate had a field day with it. they were all excited and rejoiced in the downfall of a independent media outtlet. then they sold their soul to the devil. ask every gay person you know and let me know how many of them watch the crap they throw on that network called here!. when qtv closed down, here!tv refused to see anyone from qtv for a job. such utter arrogance about it too.
      am i bitter? fuck yeah. but they are some cruel queens that run these joints and i’ll be interested to see if karma exist in gay tv land.

      Oct 30, 2009 at 11:11 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Mark Reed
      Mark Reed

      Wake up America. Dallas is ground zero for all things gay. The guy that bought The Advocate is from Dallas. We created the Dallas Principles. I funded part of the National Equality March. I really mean this – wake up!

      We started with the Dallas Principles and we have challenged Obama to honor his promises. If he does not give us our full equality – his career will be over. We are the center of the movement. It’s not Washington d.C., but many there are doing good work – it is Dallas, Texas and I am very proud.

      The Advocate will become part of our efforts or it will be disbanded. There is no more time for ass kissing or politics as usual – we need to express our anger and demand our equality. If you are in the way … God help you.

      Join EAA and make a difference. Join us or shut up. We need to win now – before the Republicans regain power. We are the future. Join us or remain in the past. Our movement will guarantee the equal rights we know we deserve.

      Sign up or Shut up.

      Oct 30, 2009 at 11:56 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Jon B
      Jon B

      People keep missing the bigger point regarding the collapse of print media. While blogs and electronic media are great, it’s the newspapers and magazines of the world that have really done most investigative journalism over the years. There’s going to be a period soon where new media isn’t profitable yet, and traditional print media is dead, and we’ll be left with TV (we know there’s no hope there, they’re all whores) and internet sites, like this one, that rely on their information from other sources, like the advocate.

      Oct 30, 2009 at 11:59 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Josh-n-Philly
      Josh-n-Philly

      Hey Mark Reed from Dallas – The Phillies are in the World Series. Shut up chump. The Rangers suck.

      Your money man from Dallas sin’t even gay – he doesn’t care about us. Plus, your goofy ideas about marching and the never-visited equalityacrossmaerica website are pathetic.

      The people working at the Advocate should walk out on all of you. Dallas – heh. Who cares? Sell your porn on gay.com and leave the news business alone. Losers.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 12:02 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Mark Reed
      Mark Reed [Different person #1 using similar name]

      Hey Josh – it’s Steven Jarchow, a Dallas Multi-millionaire. He’s in charge of the gay media now. Shut up. Your Phillies won’t beat the Yankees.

      Read about my man: http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/bus/columnists/chall/stories/DN-hall_25bus.ART2.State.Edition1.3cf7a0c.html

      He is the new mogul of gay media – read it and weep pussies.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 12:41 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Mike
      Mike

      Jarchow isn’t gay, and if he’s the mogul of gay media he’s doing a shitty fucking job. Jarchow, colichman, and that asshat Stephen macias are three of the most bumbling, inept business executives ever born. Congrats on destroying an icon of the lgbt community dumbasses

      Oct 31, 2009 at 1:27 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • YCKTR
      YCKTR

      @Mark

      LMAO…you aren’t really arching your back and flaring your nostrils about fucking gay media, right? Please say no.

      “read it and weep pussies”

      Seriously? Please say you were joking. If not, you’re a douchebag of EPIC proportions and made it very clear that you are the survivor of MANY playground humiliations.

      !

      Oct 31, 2009 at 1:40 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Jeff Barea
      Jeff Barea

      The guy in the pic looks fat and old. Get me a twink in charge and I may care.

      Also, Nick Denton’s iPhone is old and makes him look bald. Just saying

      Oct 31, 2009 at 2:04 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • mikeandrewsdantescove
      mikeandrewsdantescove

      Being involved with Dante’s Cove (Here! Television) I’ve noticed Regent wasn’t licensing artists any longer. In particular, I was told Colton Ford’s music would be featured on The Lair and that didn’t happen.

      It’s sad as I’m a subscriber and enjoy some of the movies and original programs.

      Mike
      Dante’s Cove Finale Has New Meaning Now
      http://www.rhapsody.com/mike-andrews/maleperfectionnet-dantes-cove-finale

      Oct 31, 2009 at 7:41 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • merkin
      merkin

      Wow–Im really amazed at some of the ill-informed, spiteful and poorly reasoned posts here. Its not a question of print media being asleep at the wheel and not realizing the Web was the way to go. I have been in journalism for 15 years, both print and online, and with companies big and small. And I have helmed websites for major magazines. The problem is no one has figured out how to make money from online content. People expect to pay for magazines, but we expect everything we see on the Web (except for porn) to be free. And the reports I see indicate online advertising doesnt generate enough income (or really work, for that matter).

      WSJ.com and ConsumerReports.com may do well, but its because they have massive companies behind them (with print publications) that can both absorb costs and offer writers and staffers that can do double duty. If WSJ only existed online it would shrivel on the vine in no time.

      Bloggers are not the cause of the print-media collapse. For a number of years, theyve been a good counterbalance to mainstream media, synthesizing reports from various sources and bringing new, immediate news to light. But they don’t have the resources to do a lot of original reporting or to travel to foreign locations. So its true they need mainstream (read: print) media to do the legwork for them. The bloggers operated best as commentators, not reporters. (For the most part–some Washington bloggers, for example, get their news from the horse’s mouths). Also, most bloggers write out of love, not a big cash payout.

      Instead of being catty or pointing fingers, we should try to figure out a way to keep real, well-researched journalism alive–whether its in print or online. I read sites like Towleroad and Queerty every day, but there’s no way I would rely on them for all my news, gay or otherwise. And I dont think Andy Towle or David Hauslab would either.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 9:14 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Captain Slappy
      Captain Slappy

      Finally, a magazine worthy of wiping my straight ass with.
      Oh darn….gone so soon.

      A REAL tragedy would be if Playboy went out.
      I would burn San Fransicko down over THAT shit.

      You can be catty, just keep your pointy fingers pointed elsewhere, us straight people don’t want to know where they been. Plus, they smell like shit.

      You go, girls!

      Oct 31, 2009 at 9:21 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • spindoc
      spindoc

      No. 31 · Captain Slappy said…

      just keep your pointy fingers pointed elsewhere, us straight people don’t want to know where they been. Plus, they smell like shit.
      _____________________________________

      What, you don’t like the smell of your own ass??? Oh, and by the way, you were bad in bed.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 9:29 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Joel2
      Joel2

      I agree entirely with the first Joel above: too much bitter whining in the comments about blogs and other online media.

      This very story is proof positive of traditional media’s self injury.

      The Dallas Morning News published a fawning pep rally feature on this company, while Queerty simultaneously decided to actually ask some critical questions, and found a completely different story.

      Kind of a niche beat replay of what traditional media did in the runup to Iraq, or with their pop celebrity-esque coverage of CEOs during the last bubble, which was a redux of their role in the 1990s bubble.

      Most younger readers (yes, I said that; any glance at market dynamics will show you a glaring demographic split) won’t read the DMN piece, except in its sad mention as part of the Queerty piece. When they do, their worst suspicions of print media will be confirmed.

      And even if DMN managed to innovate and get itself before those younger eyeballs, the original story (since edited) contained the phrase “alternative lifestyle”…twice…making any LGBT reader or younger gay-friendly reader cringe–and those younger readers are increasingly attuned to our pref’d terminology.

      Sure, Queerty and many sites are linkfests. But many others (ex: Politico) are not. And even Queerty, in this instance, did the reporting a major paper couldn’t, or wouldn’t.

      SCORE: Queerty 10pts, Print (DMN) 0

      Oct 31, 2009 at 9:36 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Joel2
      Joel2

      PS, @Merkin: Please, I’m weary of hearing the “oh it’s just that print doesn’t know how to make money yet” apologia.

      The DMN has enough money for a phone, but a “reporter” who didn’t use it properly. Same for her computer and Internet connection.

      The results: DMN puffery, while a young snarky blog gets the scoop. There’s something quite traditional about that, and it’s called reporting.

      Meanwhile, the DMN stenographer sits in real property overhead, as do their web guys, working daily on a slightly cleaner-looking version of the same old stuff, instead of, say, trying dramatically new web products. Do young LGBT readers in Dallas have favorite blogs? Yes. Has DMN created a gay niche blog? No. Same for sports, same for business, same for education — DMN’s website is one big central news source, when the ‘Net is all about diffusion, social media, and people talking about things with each other, as opposed to returning to some central well.

      The print v. online thing goes well beyond “monetizing,” to fundamentals of both business and reportage. And print’s failings at the latter are compounding their dilemma in the former.

      It’s a death spiral, you know it, and everyone who doesn’t pick up a paper has seen it coming for some time.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 9:59 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Mark Reed
      Mark Reed [Different person #1 using similar name]

      The gay media is not the answer, equalityacrossamerica is. After the NEM we have changed the politics in America. We have proven that anger and demanding change everything. We’re having another March in Dallas next week and you wait and see the results – I bet ENDA, DADT and DOMA fly through the Congress now. Some of us are ‘keeping their feet to the fire of outrage.”

      I commented above about the Company buying The Advocate because, like myself, he is a businessman, not a non profit pimp like many of you. He will make money or close the Advocate. Why don’t you understand that?

      Queerty is the future. Print is the past. Demanding equality is the future. Funding HRC is the past.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 11:46 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Keith Kimmel
      Keith Kimmel

      No. 22 · Mark Reed

      “Wake up America. Dallas is ground zero for all things gay.”

      You’re joking, right?

      Oct 31, 2009 at 11:54 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Mark Reed
      Mark Reed [Different person #1 using similar name]

      No Keith,

      We created the Dallas Principles and we helped fund the March in Washington. We are making the demands that are changing the political landscape. SF, DC and NYC are too afraid to make the noise that’s necessary to create full equal rights under the law.

      So, yeah – Dallas is the epicenter of LGBT Equality. We are the new “Act Up” for equality.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 11:58 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Mike
      Mike [Different person #1 using similar name]

      What will we read when Electricity goes out?

      Oct 31, 2009 at 12:54 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Ruffkin
      Ruffkin

      So Dallas is now the Epicenter of Change for the LGBT Community…hmmm,,,who would have thought?

      In the Dallas Morning News article they announced that they were cutting staff both on The Advocate and the other print media interest. So what’s the big surprise? It’s business, not a side street show. The Advocate, while being an icon in Gay History; has to either come to an end or revamp itself. The Advocate, if you have seen one lately, is thin, lackluster and loaded with advertisements catered not to the D.I.N.K.’s (Double Income No Kids) strata but catered to the HIV Positive riddled with Drug Company ads. UGH! Get lost or revamp! They have already created a (by their own claim) a successful magazine for the HIV Positive population. So maybe they should focus on what made the ADVOCATE successful in the first place ~ and that would be ~ in my opinion, reporting the news in the LGBT Community. Yes, a novel approach, simple, proven and effective.

      On a different note, the website I go to for my news and gay videos is Ruffkin.com

      Oct 31, 2009 at 1:23 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Allbe Manini
      Allbe Manini

      Better reads under Aaron Hickman????? Apparently you never read The Advocate when Judy Wieder was in charge and it was award winning.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 1:59 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • hardmannyc
      hardmannyc

      “Dallas is the epicenter of LGBT Equality. We are the new “Act Up” for equality.”

      Dream on. I just talked to two people who were in Dallas recently. They said the gay scene there was deader than dead.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 2:03 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Ruffkin
      Ruffkin

      HARDMANNYC: I don’t find NYC to be the epicenter of “gay” nor do I find San Francisco or Los Angeles or Dallas for that matter to be an epicenter.

      The epicenter is the LGBT Community, collectively in all cities and around the globe. We are collective, not isolated individualists. BTW: You have some bad information, Dallas, Texas has an extremely large gay population and the gay scene in Dallas is ALIVE and KICKING! More thriving than many washed up prior cities claiming to be the “cure of the ever fading bar and circuit life.”

      Oct 31, 2009 at 2:30 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • wendy akerman
      wendy akerman

      I am so glad you said that about JudyWieder. Those issues where real interviews with politicians and presidents and closeted stars came out…OMG. That was the magazine’s golden age. Not this boybubble crap “what do strait guys think of gay guys?” WHAT?? This was a national treasure before people like Colichman and Hickman and Barrett and Here and PNO got a hold of it. Find Judy.Hopefully she still gives a poop. Signed, Horrified!

      Oct 31, 2009 at 3:17 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • David Markowitz
      David Markowitz

      No she’s not dead. Just heartbroken I am sure. This tragedy started when she left. The Advocate lost its driving wheel.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 3:22 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Keith Kimmel
      Keith Kimmel

      Considering that I go to Dallas once a month (at least – three times this month) I have to say, I find that the community there is far less visible there than in places like San Francisco, Chicago or New York City.

      Dallas has a scene, but its not very visible or lively, unless you count the number of “productive” hookup ads on Craigslist and Manhunt. I swear it is about easiest city to hookup in ever. But the idea that Dallas is now the center of the gay universe is, well, goofy. Yeah, some influential, active gays may live there, but the same can be said for all of the cities I mentioned above.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 3:29 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Mark Reed
      Mark Reed [Different person #1 using similar name]

      Dallas is the center of the Gay Rights Movement. That was my point. We are organizing marches and protests. The rest of the Country will follow our lead. EqualityAcrossAmerica.com

      Oct 31, 2009 at 4:12 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Counterpoint
      Counterpoint

      Since we are on the topic of the failing GLBT media moguls and the rise of related GLBT blogs and such, I thought I’d make this short point.

      Although advertising dollars seems to be the major focus for the GLBT media these days to retain their operating budgets, I feel that corporate advertising has become rather excessive in our media to the point of losing our community readership, the very audience that our publications aim to target. And lost readers means no one reading or buying the paper, thus an eventually bankrupt publication.

      Most people I know are tired of the showboating and elitism fostered by this idolized corporate advertising circle which does nothing for GLBT media other than report (ad nauseum) every week on who’s who in gay/lesbian corporate and political America and how they royally screwed over everyone else in the community to get ahead so they can strut their peacock feathers and shout to the world “I have ARRIVED in Gay America” (gag,gag,gag……)

      The result is of course that people from the broader GLBT community who either have another perspective to share or complain about the elitism are quickly blackballed and in some instances utterly attacked and even banned from commenting entirely on GLBT news blogs.

      Mr. Reed, you had mentioned Dallas in your commentary and none is more a prime example of this point than your own local GLBT publication The Dallas Voice, which does nothing but report on the friends of the editors and reporters there and which discriminates and launches online conspiracies against people in the community who uncover information that you, The Resource Center of Dallas and The North Texas GLBT Chamber of Commerce don’t want people to know in the media. And what was the comment you made above ??

      “…..If you are in the way, God help you……..”

      Hmm… sounds like a threat to me. So Mr. Reed, I would encourage you and others from your Dallas political campaign to answer commentary with a bit more temperament in your judgement, especially since the editor and reporters from the Dallas Voice, the directors from the Resource Center, the directors from the NT GLBT Chamber and those other “powerful” leaders from the Dallas political circles (aka “The Pink Mafia”

      http://www.dmagazine.com/Home/1996/11/01/THE_PINK_MAFIA.aspx )

      aren’t here to censor the truth of what really goes on in the Dallas GLBT community and especially in the Dallas GLBT media.

      Hey folks, here is the link to how people get treated in the Dallas GLBT media and the community publication which condones it.

      http://www.dallasvoice.com/instant-tea/2009/10/29/get-ready-to-march-on-wednesday/#comments

      So in closing, I feel it is some of the GLBT journalists and editors themselves who are contributing a large part to the downfall of GLBT media. I mean really, who want’s to pick up a GLBT publication every week or visit a GLBT media blog everyday only to see constant belittling of fellow community members for having diverse opinions or finding out that some people in the community were censored because they uncovered something that a tight little political clique didn’t want everyone to find out about.

      Perhaps when our community journalism circle finally takes responsibility and creates a culture friendly enough that people will wish to participate in their news, then perhaps our publications will one day thrive again.

      Thanks

      Oct 31, 2009 at 4:44 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • SpireaX
      SpireaX

      Since my 20’s (I’m now 40 y.o.), I have been an avid reader of the Advocate. And while it is true that most of print media is in trouble, this doesn’t lessen the pain of losing the Advocate.

      I am so thoroughly disappointed that the Advocate is becoming an insert in Out magazine. I subscribe to both and each provides their own unique takes on the LGBT issues, the Advocate will be the one I mourn for.

      @Mark Reed–you’re claim of Dallas being the new “epicenter of of LGBT Equality” and is the “the new ‘Act Up’ for equality” sets a new bar for arrogance. Having come up with the Dallas Principles does not even come close to the years of activism all the “other cities” you disparage. I say it’s about time Dallas contributed something.

      Cloaking yourself in such high minded descriptions such as being “the new ‘ACT UP'” is simply laughable considering your organization’s EXTREMELY SHORT HISTORY.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 5:09 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • n2denim
      n2denim

      This news comes as absolutely no surprise. It has been years in the coming, I’m certain it will not be the last that we hear about the demise of these publications.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 5:45 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • OoohSomeWordsandaWebsite
      OoohSomeWordsandaWebsite

      Dallas is the center of the gay movement, because some folks gathered in a hotel there and wrote some words, and then built a cute and helpful little website that lets you contact elected officials?

      Um, I already knew I wanted more than HRC was giving me, and already have Senate.gov and House.gov. I guess additional sites and ways to reach electeds is always a good thing, but if it comes with a big bag of arrogance, thx but no thx, lad.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 5:58 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Ted Gideonse
      Ted Gideonse

      Um, when is Queerty going to run the letter from Regent pointing out the half of this post is completely wrong? If it’s been posted on Facebook, Queerty has received it.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 6:11 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • SpireaX
      SpireaX

      Yo, Mark Reed. Were you the gofer or did you serve coffee to the 24 authors of the Dallas Principles?

      Your claim that “we created the Dallas Principles” is full of shit. Who exactly is “we?” The principles were named after the location but doesn’t mean Dallas INSPIRED the authors. Obama’s inaction did, not Dallas.

      Hmmm…let’s look at the list: http://www.thedallasprinciples.org/The_Dallas_Principles/Authors.html

      Let’s see…I count folks from CA, DC, MA, FL, MD, NY and NC. What’s missing? Dallas…or anyone from TX for that matter. You must be on meth because you’re suffering from delusion.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 6:40 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Mike
      Mike

      Where is a link to this letter?

      Oct 31, 2009 at 6:42 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • hardmannyc
      hardmannyc

      Watching this thread get hijacked by someone who keeps harping on how crucial Dallas (DALLAS!?!???!?!) is to the gay rights movement is like listening to a Monty Python record. Stoned. Very, very stoned.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 7:19 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Mike
      Mike [Different person #2 using similar name]

      Just read the Regent letter. It’s online at kennethinthe212.com. And it doesn’t dispute half of what was said here, as Ted says. All it does is try to put a positive spin on a bad situation by saying things like we’re going to relaunch our website, we’re going to add video to it!

      Here’s a breakdown of what Queerty said, and what Regent said:

      QUEERTY: Just days after a glowing profile in the Dallas Morning News of Paul Colichman and Stephen Jarchow’s Regent/Here Media comes word from inside the company: it’s a sinking ship.

      REGENT: Says times are tough. Doesn’t deny the place is bleeding cash.

      QUEERTY: Multiple sources tell Queerty Colichman and Jarchow (pictured below) have gutted The Advocate’s masthead in an attempt to stem the mag’s bleeding cash reserves.

      REGENT: They don’t like the term “gutted,” but don’t deny firing huge numbers of their staff.

      QUEERTY: A money loser when Here Media bought it from PlanetOut Partners, they’ve been unable to turn things around since acquiring the title.

      REGENT: Conveniently ignores this.

      QUEERTY: On Wednesday, an estimated 13 staffers were let go, including the magazine’s managing editor and 15-year veteran John Jameson was axed, along with art director Craig Edwards (his less experienced deputy was given the job, for much less cash), associate photo editor Meghan Quinn, and copy editor Teresa Morrison. On the business side, associate publisher Mike Phelps and production manager Brian Lindsey were let go. (We’re told Lindsey “sent out a naked picture of himself with a sock over his happy parts” upon receiving the news. Send it in if you have it, please.)

      REGENT: Says nothing about this. Hard to argue against the truth, eh?

      QUEERTY: And here’s the news we’re hearing (but have not confirmed with the company): The Advocate will cease publication as a standalone magazine offered on the newsstand. Instead, it’ll be poly-bagged as an insert of the company’s fashion and lifestyle glossy Out.

      REGENT: Denies this, but is very vague on the polygbagging with Out. Regent, come clean — will it or will it not be polybagged with Out? Will it or will it not have a newsstand presence?

      QUEERTY: Meanwhile, at HIV Plus — which we’re told actually makes cash, because of all the Big Pharma ads — three members of the magazine’s tiny full-time staff were fired: managing editor Bob Adams, art director Raine Bascos, and fact checker Angela Bervidoro.

      REGENT: Doesn’t deny any of this. Says the magazine will continue with a one-person staff. Queerty never said it wouldn’t continue, only that it’s staff was gutted despite the magazine making money because The Advocate has bled so much money away from the company.

      QUEERTY: But if you’re still employed at Regent? The news isn’t very good for you, either. Human resources director Christin Dennis told staffers on a Sept. 25 conference all that employee payroll deductions for health-care insurance double immediately, and senior staffers would see even higher increases. It’s the only way Regent can “meet it’s financial targets,” Dennis said.

      REGENT: Conveniently ignores this.

      QUEETY: Some freelance and contract writers and photogs, meanwhile, have gone unpaid for months; some have threatened to stop working entirely until their balances are paid. (Don’t expect that to happen quickly: Editorial operations coordinator Rob Chin, who handled payments, was let go this week.)

      REGENT: Conveniently ignores this.

      QUEERTY: After laying off digital staffers earlier this year, the gay media giant continues to lose cash in almost every department.

      REGENT: Conveniently ignores this.

      QUEERTY: Regent/Here’s porn unit, Unzipped Media, already shuttered two titles (err, they went “quarterly”), leaving only Unzipped. And HereTV, the company’s pay-TV service, may be “available” in 54 million homes, but an infinitesimal fraction of them actually subscribe to the $8/month network. (HereTV pays very little for its programming, however, which means it has lower costs than other networks.)

      REGENT: Conveniently ignores this.

      QUEERTY: At a company party in September to celebrate employee anniversaries, Jarchow joked about two honorees who were missing that day — because they had been “terminated.” Get it? (This, from a guy who had the company hire his daughter Boo when it acquired PlanetOut Partner’s LPI Media divison last year. Yes, she still has her job.)

      REGENT: Conveniently ignores this, but praises Boo Jarchow up and down for her involvement in the national equality march. How nice for her. But did you force the company to hire her? Why is she still employed when other, more deserving staff members aren’t?

      QUEERTY: As for Colichman? He “continues his useless prancing around the office, prattling about how awesome his ‘five-star’ websites are because they now contain video,” says one source with first-hand knowledge of the situation. (Worth noting: Colichman last month fired one of the company’s only videographers.)

      REGENT: Says Colichman prefers the term skipping over prancing. But doesn’t deny any of this. And the Regent letter even confirms Colichman’s enthusiasm for adding video to his websites.

      QUEERTY: Those five-star websites he’s talking about include Gay.com, an excellent domain name for anyone in gay media, but one Regent has yet to effectively monetize. With most of Gay.com’s cash coming from chat subscribers, it continues to be plagued by technical issues and losing market share to sites like Manhunt.net.

      REGENT: Conveniently ignores this.

      QUEERTY: (We called and left messages for Here Media publicity staffers Mark Umbach and Luis Lopez, as well as Here Media chief Colichman, and Regent general manager Stephen Macias, and are awaiting a response. We’ll let you know what we hear, if anything.)

      REGENT: Never bothers to say why company officials couldn’t respond to some direct questions and relies instead on a letter penned by its general manager.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 7:26 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Billy LaPoint
      Billy LaPoint

      Mike:

      What on earth kind of time do you have on your hands to pick apart Regent this way? What’s your intention? Would be hysterical to watch you try and keep an LGBT national print publication alive in its current form while decades-old insitutions like Gourmet have bitten the dust completely. Just hysterical.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 7:33 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Lady Ga-Gasp
      Lady Ga-Gasp

      Billy, darling, see there is this thing called the internet.

      And within it these entities called blogs, which are in many cases, becoming a sort of hyper-localized or niche form of a topical news organ.

      Much of the success of blogs is to be found in their avid readership, guys like Mike, who are in many cases well-versed and/or very interested in the topic at hand, and who get a lot of personal satisfaction as contributors to the conversation.

      Who’d have thought?

      Oct 31, 2009 at 8:14 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • SpireaX
      SpireaX

      Billy: You’re the missing the point which is Regent/Here is basically abandoning long-time subscribers and dances around the question whether Advocate will be stand-alone or poly-bagged with Out. By the way, the Advocate is also a “decades-old institution” like Gourmet; it was established in 1967.

      What are you, 16? Because it sounds like you have no appreciation of queer history and publications. The Advocate has been with us for a long time and is saddening to watch it fold. Yes, progress sometimes mean the end for some institutions but it is far from hysterical.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 8:14 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Billy LaPoint
      Billy LaPoint

      SpireaX:

      As I understand it, they have announced that it will be a separate publication, polybagged with Out. They are not dancing around the question. My point (perhaps poorly written) was that Mike’s post was simply about tearing Regent down, and that it’s much easier to do that than it is to try to keep the Advocate alive. I’m 50, so I understand fully the importance of the book. I was not suggesting that the change of the Advocate was hysterical. I was suggesting that it would be hysterical to try to watch Mike run the operation.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 8:46 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Joe
      Joe

      Out is in very good financial shape & Advocate is launching a NewsHour TV Show. Gay Media is moving forward people.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 9:04 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Mark Reed
      Mark Reed [Different person #1 using similar name]

      It’s amusing to read some of these comments. I am not certain of the eventual fate of The Advocate, but a fellow Dallas businessman in now in charge. He’s tough – like most of us in Dallas. So, yeah – things are a changing.

      The other point I made was Dallas IS the epicenter of Gay Rights. It is the “Dallitude” that has been missing from the equal rights movement. We are delivering that now. We helped make the National Equality March a success (and you saw how fast the Hate Crimes Bill got done) and we are now taking over activist efforts across America. We put our money and our anger where our mouth is. We know how to win and we will.

      Stop acting like you didn’t see this coming. It is time for some real action if we are going to get all of our rights – right now. We don’t screw around here and you have been warned.

      I’d like to see The Advocate survive, but it’s a lot less important than EqualityAcrossAmerica.com Get involved, or get left behind.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 9:40 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Mark Reed
      Mark Reed [Different person #1 using similar name]

      @ Spireax:

      Learn to read. I don’t have time for your b.s.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 9:42 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • OoohSomeWordsandaWebsite
      OoohSomeWordsandaWebsite

      “We don’t screw around here and you have been warned.”

      ROFL

      Oct 31, 2009 at 9:48 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • richard
      richard

      I’m not surprised. Colichman et al. have always brought the ethics of a gloryhole into the office. Why stop now?

      Oct 31, 2009 at 10:11 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • SpireaX
      SpireaX

      Oooo…Mark Reed, gofer for the Dallas Principles 24 authors. I’m scared of you. Really, just using the “Dallitude” consigns you to inane asshole-dom. You’re probably right about not having time for my b.s. You have plenty of your own to spew out. Ciao, asshole.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 10:11 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Joel2
      Joel2

      “Out is in very good financial shape & Advocate is launching a NewsHour TV Show. Gay Media is moving forward people.”

      Anyone can contract to have a pilot or couple of episodes produced, but what’s your distribution? Without some explanation as to how “we’re going to have a TV show” contributes meaningfully to your revenues, it could be good money thrown upon bad. How does one TV program, even assuming you did get decent distribution deals lined up, lift company revenues much? Sounds like just a marketing bauble, and for the most anemic brand in the stable at that.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 10:12 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Mike
      Mike [Different person #2 using similar name]

      They’re going to “distribute” their Advocate TV show on Here, Advocate.com, and gay.com, according to the Regent letter. That will get them what? 10 viewers? And Billy, my point is that Regent spins and distorts and never answers any questions directly. The gist of the original Queerty post is that the place is a sinking ship and that the print version of the Advocate is very near vanishing for good, and they never bothered to address those sad facts. And the proper phrase it “try to keep,” not “try and keep.” When you’re going to insult me, I’d prefer you use proper grammar.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 10:21 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Billy LaPoint
      Billy LaPoint

      Mike:

      Is this grammatically correct?: You are a bitch.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 11:25 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • hardmannyc
      hardmannyc

      From “Mark”:

      “I don’t find NYC to be the epicenter of “gay” nor do I find San Francisco or Los Angeles or Dallas for that matter to be an epicenter.”

      “So, yeah – Dallas is the epicenter of LGBT Equality. We are the new “Act Up” for equality.”

      If you’re going to be a monomaniac, at least be a consistent one.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 11:40 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • David Ehrenstein
      David Ehrenstein

      The Avocado has been on life supports for some time. The great era that Richard Rouilard ushered in died with him.

      Towleroad is the pace to be for news.

      And much else.

      Oct 31, 2009 at 11:42 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Peter
      Peter

      If any of the writers want to keep their journalistic integrity they will NOT contact Queerty about work.

      Nov 1, 2009 at 1:33 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Mike
      Mike [Different person #2 using similar name]

      Yes, Billy, dear, that is grammatically correct. Now go fuck yourself, peasant.

      Nov 1, 2009 at 1:50 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • amber
      amber

      Do you know anything about SheWired.com, the lesbian website owned by Regent Media?

      Nov 1, 2009 at 11:33 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • media bias
      media bias

      @ Bily La Point #68 <===== this

      @ Peter #71<===== this

      @Mike #67 re: "try to keep" <=== this is why I hate the internet, you undermine your valid point with personal attacks and self serving bomb throwing

      @Mike #72,<===== your ilk will (thankfully) cause the demise of nasty hater blogs like this one. For now, the internet is quite simply overrun with condescending blogggers and bullies, manipulating every piece with their personal bias hidded as fact and attention getting headlines. Hitwhores. Regurgitating something they READ instead of taking one minute to research.

      For me you're all missing the underlying point.

      The reason for the failure of the printed press is it's absense of WORTH just like any other industry.

      Most have completely and unabashedly abandoned any "JOURNALISM" and *OBJECTIVITY* for a political agenda. They embrace and promote their political agenda, skewing each story to boobus Americanus.

      All you have to do is:

      1.Listen to the stated Obama strategy of controlling the media and access along with the new initiative to control the airways AND isolating the enemy (Fox reporters) from public acceptability. This is not what journalism in America stood for. If your "side" can't stand up to a vigorous debate then you have a problem.

      2. Look at the NYT ridiculous afterthought about the Van Jones issue. "Yeah, we might have been too slow in picking up this story". Bullshit line of the year. The attempt to marginalize and ignore the issue hoping it would go away failed. Right or wrong the debate should have been addressed.

      It'll all sort itself out and America will chose what is of value. But meanwhile there's gonna be alot of propaganda, lies manipulation, and dirty politics to live through.

      Just read the Oprah piece here mocking Christian Siriano and calling him a Starbucks card creator in the p.o.v.

      The boy has extensive diversity in his business in many sectors. He's still a popular fashion designer on the runway and ready to wear and has umpteen other projects making money in addition to that little card thing but Queerty skillfully manipulates what you read knowing none of you will even look it up then dismiss him as an asshole.

      Why? Because of the political agenda against him for using the term "trannyhotmess".

      Lazy blogs. Can't be bothered presenting any point worth evaluating (which should have been "Is it Worth Being A Reality Star?"

      And in CLASSIC FORM, invoking Oprah's name to attract blog hits. That piece WAS a hot mess.

      Nov 1, 2009 at 11:51 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Lady Ga-Gasp
      Lady Ga-Gasp

      I video recorded my last meeting with Cristin Dennis, head of HR at Regent.

      Here it is:

      Nov 1, 2009 at 12:21 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Mrs Patrick Campbell
      Mrs Patrick Campbell

      The Advocate was once a good paper, before it sold out to the NWO and BigPharma, etc., and became oh so PC(read: REALLY REALLY boring). Oh, and when they banished sex(the ‘classified’ ads) from the paper in the 1980s most sisters stopped reading it. BTW, both ourself and Miss Tammy Cruise once advertised our ‘services’ in the pages of the good old Advocate around 1978-1980(when sex was still permitted).

      SO this is our final thought on today’s Advocate: Good Riddance to Bad rubbish!

      Nov 1, 2009 at 12:36 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Olga
      Olga

      This definitely explains why they haven’t sent me a check since the May one. Too bad I had to find out from another mag source about it.

      I think giving Queerty a shout is the best idea I’ve heard to date. :)

      Nov 1, 2009 at 12:57 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • dontblamemeivotedforhillary
      dontblamemeivotedforhillary

      Avocado Magazine was always behind the curve and lately, straight co-opted like the defunct HX Magazine rag here. Now it’s a supplement with the once mighty Out magazine that turned into Project Bumway Models and ads you can pull out and rub the cologne on your stinky boyfriend. I knew they were in trouble when free truckloads of their magazines arrived at the Village lgbt Center. There was no Buzz factor, center-left voices of California suburbia and being out of touch with the grittier side of gay life, including the epidemic of violence. News media does better coming from New York City (after we cut your throat first!) If you can make it here, you can make it Queer! Like Vanity Fair….

      Nov 1, 2009 at 1:20 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • NoDoubleStandards
      NoDoubleStandards

      Reality check:

      Most print media is down sizing right now, and several key players are shifting to online media. Actually, they were headed this way before the economic collapse of the last year. So, when people post comments to suggest that somehow these shifts are proof that The Advocate or Here is having problems, I am not exactly certain what planet you are living on. The company may or may not be having problems, but the proof given thus far is let’s just say light in the current media landscape. Based on the evidence used here, one could conclude that every media company in the U.S. is about to go under considering companies like NBC, CBS and others are cutting staff. Hell, even Yahoo has cut its staff. Again, Queerty may turn out to have been right, but not based on this evidence.

      Nov 1, 2009 at 3:00 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • NoDoubleStandards
      NoDoubleStandards

      Also, some of you may want to leave the gay bubble sometimes. It is clear from your analysis here you are not living in economic reality.

      Nov 1, 2009 at 3:04 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Joel2
      Joel2

      Nice try there, “NoDoubleStandards,” but you’ve presented completely false analogies, and meanwhile ignored bruising business realities in the niche.

      Yes, some large media corporations have experienced layoffs as well, but the adjective is important. Their size allows them to experience attrition without risk to the company as a going concern. And some, like NBC, have major parent corps. backing them up. If GE is about to go under, *then* you can equate them with small and mightily-challenged niche corps.

      The other factor your “reality check” ignores is what most daily newspaper corps. and other traditional media have ignored: we’re not just dealing with competing businesses here, but competing lifestyle assumptions. Traditional media are engaging in convulsions, sometimes death throws, to recast themselves as products for people who are simply looking elsewhere for their news, entertainment, and other electronic content.

      Your “reality check” seems to be saying: “everyone’s suffering, so you cannot say any one company is in terrible shape.” I’ve heard that before, from people who worked for major newspapers that simply no longer exist.

      Nov 1, 2009 at 4:26 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • upliberal
      upliberal

      REGENT: Never bothers to say why company officials couldn’t respond to some direct questions and relies instead on a letter penned by its general manager.//

      That’s because it’s GM Stephan Macias’ job to be the fawning mouthpiece for “Mr. Colichman.” Macias doesn’t have a business bone in his body, and is the antithesis of contributing to collaborative work environment (he’s too busy managing up).

      But goodness, don’t tell HIM he’s not senior management!

      Nov 1, 2009 at 4:28 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • NoDoubleStandards
      NoDoubleStandards

      Everything I wrote is verifiable by reading sites that concentrate on media related issues including paidcontent, mediabistro and multiple other media watcher sites.

      Or hell, reading a news paper or the huffington post since it is not exactly obscure news. You had people joking a few months ago about a bail out for print mags. You have multiple mags not just down sizing but going under.

      If you are going to post comments, you should at least try not to do so with something so easily verifiable as the state of the print and media industries right now.

      Hell, they are calling for the death of indie film right now because most of those companies are facing similar pressures. Get out of your bubble. It is embarrassing to read these comments here.

      Nov 1, 2009 at 4:37 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Joel2
      Joel2

      So if the failings of print media have been so blindingly obvious…

      …why’d Regent buy them?

      And why does your mastery of the obvious not address the folly in trying to contort dying brands into the new hip thing? That was the bottom line of my post above, which you’ve completely dodged.

      Nov 1, 2009 at 5:48 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Charles Merrill
      Charles Merrill

      Queerty is right, it is a shitty marketplace for magazines, gay or straight. Conde Nast the leader, is down on it’s knees facing bankruptcy. It was great during the 80’s when the rich and famous were at their peak and something to write about, the Advocate had every star remotely connected to gay issues on their cover. That period is over and no one wants to read about rags to riches stories. Everyone is worried shit about the economic future. About Dallas Principles. I was in Dallas and one of the authors. The facilitator of the group was from Dallas, but he was the only Texan in the group. We got much criticism from the Dallas gay press that we named our manifesto “The Dallas Principles”. Cleve Jones was invited but declined because of his Marxist socialist views in alignment with his co partner in National Equality Across America Marxist Sherry Wolf. The Dallas Principles did not wish to co-op with a socialist movement.

      Nov 1, 2009 at 10:18 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • owen
      owen

      I’ve found The Advocate much more readable with John Barrett as the EIC, the newer format was engaging, the articles were interesting, intelligent and very well written by great writers like Benoit Lewis, and Michael Gross. I’m not sure how many people here have the capacity to sit and read a 5 or 6 page article, from what I gather from these posts. Such bitterness here.

      Nov 1, 2009 at 10:19 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Mark Reed
      Mark Reed [Different person #1 using similar name]

      @ Charles Merrill:

      The Dallas Principles were fine, but not enough. A list of goals is a good start, but Equality Across America will take it from there. We have attracted the young generation of activists and our March For Equality has already delivered the Hates Crime Laws.

      Get involved. ENDA, DADT and DOMA go down next. We’ll March and demand again and a again – if we need to. It’s time to act up and demand all of our rights – now.

      Nov 1, 2009 at 11:04 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • NoDoubleStandards
      NoDoubleStandards

      I think if they rebrand as an online destination they will be fine. They have more a followership than sites like this.

      Nov 2, 2009 at 12:59 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • lisa F
    • lisa F
      lisa F

      http://photos-e.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs088.snc3/15555_1262641123198_1144803239_1879455_1449901_n.jpg
      Here is the link to the pic of Brian and the sock boy…Brian Lindsey is the one in the costume…not the sock
      CHECK IT OUT :)
      Is it too “explicit” for a publication with full frontal male (erect)nudity? Your call….

      Nov 2, 2009 at 2:34 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Billy LaPoint
      Billy LaPoint

      Owen:

      Agreed…book is much better now…one of the dopes bashing Jon’s editorial referred to the cover story about the straight Irag vet (and other straight military members) who are currently leading the fight to kill Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell. “Wendy” slams this as moronic and stupid, having CLEARLY not read the piece. She’s the moron.

      And another thing…people here claiming that Queerty and Towleroad and superior…THEY DON’T CREATE ANY EDIT, YOU IDIOTS…they just aggregate it. Support Towleroad while ignoring the producers of the content and eventually Towleroad (which I love) goes away. GET A CLUE.

      Nov 2, 2009 at 2:52 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Mike
      Mike [Different person #2 using similar name]

      Oh Billy. Have you ever looked at Advocate.com? It consists mostly of rewrites of stuff posted earlier, on other sites and blogs. It is so behind the curve it’s not even funny.

      Nov 2, 2009 at 3:41 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • ME
      ME

      I must be among the rare few that don’t like reading too much on a screen. Things like Kindle would give me a headache. So, while I see all the fluff (gossip, insta-news) doing well online and breaking facts being served well in such an instantaneous environment, real journalism isn’t done in 30 seconds. Fact checking and well-crafted accounts are important if you don’t want endless redacted statements and updates (listening, Queerty?). But I suppose in a world that counts individuals such as Perez Hilton among its sources and ignorant opinion becomes journalism on CNN, etc., we can only hope that quality reporting is shot mercifully in the head so it doesn’t have to suffer too long looking at its killer.

      Nov 2, 2009 at 6:59 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Joel2
      Joel2

      Me: While sitting that far up on your anti-Net high horse, are you able to see the reporting of, say, Talking Points Memo?

      While the newspapers slept, TPM exposed the scandal that brought down Atty. Gen. Gonzales: the political firings of US Attys. across the nation, and the political machinations here in DC in engineering those firings.

      Or, perhaps you missed the news stream on the latest Iranian near-counterrevolution, brought by Tweet, YouTube, Andrew Sullivan, and others? It was that ‘Net stream that lured traditional media to the hotspot. Many were kept away by the authorities, and when everyone was kicked out, the ‘Net news stream was our only source, and a powerful one at that.

      Or, maybe you missed some years ago the LGBT news about “ex-gay” Newsweek coverboy John Paulk being confronted in a gay bar? It ran ‘Net-only before being published in print, and mostly circulated widely online nationwide, moreso than in print.

      Reading news on the ‘Net may hurt your eyes, but it has often been a pleasure to mine.

      (LaPoint: the Dallas Morning News ran a puff piece; Queerty asked questions and found a very different picture, indeed. That’s called reporting. That’s called editorial content. And in this instance, it’s called a clear win for Queerty over a 124-year-old daily newspaper.)

      Nov 2, 2009 at 8:16 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Outsider
      Outsider

      @ Charles Merrill:

      Interesting perspective Charles, but I don’t buy it.

      The very undertone of your above comment combined with the extravagant, elitist and blatant exclusivity of your above link to your website clearly shows that you are so out of touch with what is really going on in GLBT media and culture these days.

      “Self-made Millionaire”, “Marxism”, “Socialist Movement”, “Dallas Principles” Hmm…. These sound like terms coming straight from the wealthy conservative Republican party, and Lord forbid that as a gay “millionaire” you would call yourself a Republican……….Give me a break !!

      Let’s look at the Dallas Principles for what it really is. A bunch of elitist, wealthy and privileged GLBT “activist” figures who secretly sent invitations to other elitists to have this cafe latte summit in a city which supports this type of elitist republican ideology. You created some plan that you somehow think will get you all the next gay nobel prize for world peace (gee, that would look great on your wealthy portfolios…….)

      The fact is, many have never heard of any of you on that author list prior to this venture, unless of course you are well known in the posh gay Conde Naste / Airline “society” in which case that would explain how you all chose Dallas for your summit…….

      Rest assured, this comment isn’t coming from one of the other “activist” organizations because I think they are all a bunch of elitist blowhards as well. However, if you are going to voice your opinion about the gay media, perhaps you should refer to everyday people in the community and not your celebrity “rags to riches” people and your first class travel publications, both of which have contributed largely to this divide in the GLBT community and of the exclusive nature of GLBT reporting.

      Perhaps you should paint some scenes of GLBT ghetto life. At least that would be more in touch with the modern plight of GLBT culture, not grandiose Venetian backdrops from a five star cafe……

      Nov 2, 2009 at 12:52 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • bradley
      bradley

      So who else got axed? Eric Feldman I hear… He made Colichman and Macias look like fairy godmothers in comparison. Karma, kids!

      Nov 2, 2009 at 1:00 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Charles Merrill
      Charles Merrill

      Outsider, don’t give me that socialist “GLBT ghetto” communist manifesto bullshit. There are no ghettos in America, but there are those like you wishing to influence the young into thinking they have no future in America and the wealth should be equally divided. Get an education.

      Nov 2, 2009 at 8:30 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Outsider
      Outsider

      Spoken like a true A-List conservative gay republican.

      Step out of your million dollar ivory towers in the Hamptons (or wherever the hell you A-list rich gays live) and spend some time visiting life in the disenfranchised gay communities across America. Perhaps then you will whistle a different tune from the usual ” Look how WONDERFUL and SPECIAL we are in the GLBT media, we DESERVE glory and people kissing our asses due to our wealth and palm greasing talents”.

      You make me ashamed to call you members of the GLBT community.

      Oops, I forgot, the word “community” is a “socialist” term.

      Nov 2, 2009 at 10:19 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • DEEPTHROAT
      DEEPTHROAT

      Gay print media is driven by consolidated metro areas that create a gay culture within the community. As online intensifies and “gay” becomes more mainstream and assimilated, the necessity of gay print media will deminish. Today’s younger gays (under 35) are video/audio/online driven. I bet anything that the commenters above who prefer to “hold and read a printed publication” are over 35, if not over 45. It’s generational. That is not to say nobody will read on paper anymore, but it will define the print market. It will be local, and it will only survive in urban tight gay communities where advertisors beieve and get an ROI. Continuing to go national print to a national gay audience will be tough. If Advocate can’t pull it off, then OUT, INSTINCT, etc are going to have to be cutting edge and attract new, younger readers to keep the blood flowing. Most less-than-35’s I’ve met are not news junkies for gay news. Short news bites are about as much as they can handle. 3 paragraphs read is a lot on any topic. The Blades and Advocates of this world were built on a “struggle”, freedom fighters, etc. Ask anyone under 35 who Larry Kramer is. No clue. And once told; don’t give a shit. There is no threat any more, so getting gay news is ho and hum.

      And I thought Texas was going to secede. So, what’s all this fuss about Dallas?

      Nov 3, 2009 at 12:31 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • dontblamemeivotedforhillary
      dontblamemeivotedforhillary

      L.A should diversify as Hollywood has pretty much moved to the Big Apple. Who wants to drive for 6 hours when you can be there in 15 minutes. NYC is the Center of World Media (pinkie-finger to curled mouth like Dr Evil!)

      It’s always Marcia, Marcia, Marcia!

      I hate Larry Kramer on Curb Your Enthusiasm but what has that got to do with GAY?

      Nov 3, 2009 at 12:45 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • George
      George

      Hey Joel 2 — With regards to your comment to Billy La Point…

      My 5 year old interviewed our dog and she is reporting that he shat in the backyard. Is that editorial? Funny. I thought you had to, like, study how to be a journalist, do fact checks, things like that…

      Sure, I guess in it’s broadest sense, what Queerty did was editorial. It was reporting, I suppose. But not with any journalistic integrity. Blogs have their place. Love ‘em. And the internet has opened up a whole slew of positive consequences in the field of journalism in general — voices like ours being heard, for example. I am grateful for blogs as they allow gay news and stories get heard like never before.

      But if we reach a point where we count on blogs for our reporting, we’re going to a bad place.

      Nov 3, 2009 at 2:01 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Joel2
      Joel2

      “I thought you had to, like, study how to be a journalist, do fact checks, things like that…”

      Yes, like all those esteemed reporters who overwhelmingly failed as we slid towards war in Iraq. And the others that did the pep rally reporting as embeds. And those esteemed business reporters who treated CEOs with fawning praise, not much different from celebrities, as the bubble got larger, and larger. And the ones for whom the biggest challenge in America for a solid two years was a president’s sex; I believe James Carville termed it “like crack cocaine for you reporters, you love it and you can’t get enough.” Or the reporters who ignored the health care crisis for 16 years.

      Yeah, I, like, know what you’re talking about.

      Nov 3, 2009 at 2:55 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Skeeter Sanders
      Skeeter Sanders

      Keith Kimmel wrote:

      “I wonder when people are going to realize that ALL print media is a dying industry. Newspapers, magazines, books (I have owned two small publishing companies – shuttered both as I could see the writing on the wall) and the list goes on. The future is in new media, the printing press is obsolete.”

      * * *

      WRONG, Keith! Only PAID-CIRCULATION print media is dying. FREE-CIRCULATION print media — particularly weekly newspapers — are still very much alive and many are even thriving.

      The REAL reason the Internet is killing daily newspapers and other paid-circulation print publications is a simple matter of economics — and logistics: Why bother to pay to read the very same stories that were printed hours after you’ve read them for free online?

      More than three times as many people now read the Internet edition of The New York Times than the print edition. But
      the Times (and other print media) have yet to come up with a new economic model to make their Internet editions profitable.

      The problem is that there is now an entire generation that has grown up with the Internet — and has grown accustomed to getting their information from the Internet without having to directly pay for it. With the execption of The Wall Street Journal — which, after all, is a business publication — every attempt by newspapers and magazines to get their Internet readers to pay for reading their stories online has been met with fierce public resistance.

      There is really only one solution. Instead of charging readers directly, publishers should do what cable and satellite TV networks have done for years — charge Internet service providers for carrying their Web sites. The ISPs would then pass the cost on to their subscribers.

      For the notion of a totally-free-of-charge Internet is really an illusion. You’re paying to access the Internet when your ISP — be it dial-up, DSL, cable or satellite — sends you your monthly bill. More than 90 percent of U.S. households now pay for what they watch on TV, including their local stations, via cable and satellite through their monthly bills.

      Print is far from dead, as the publisher of any free-circulation publication can attest. Rather it’s the paid-circulation dinosaurs that are doomed to extinction.

      Nov 3, 2009 at 3:52 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Mike
      Mike

      A note here on Owen. He is actually jon barrett’s partner, Sean moran.

      Nov 3, 2009 at 6:01 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Joel2
      Joel2

      “WRONG, Keith! Only PAID-CIRCULATION print media is dying. FREE-CIRCULATION print media — particularly weekly newspapers — are still very much alive and many are even thriving.”

      What information do you have to support such a statement? Which are “thriving” exactly?

      The largest chain of the largest alt-weeklies in the nation, Creative Loafing, Inc. was just recently handed to its creditors by a bankruptcy judge. For the rest, their readerships continue to experience slight declines, as they have since 2000.

      While it’s true they are faring better than dailies, they’ve shed massive numbers of staff, shrunk physically, and generally struggled to keep their marrow (distribution and sales) protected, while losing the flesh and bone of their value to readers, i.e. editorial. The results of that risky surgery were seen at the Boulder News–highest readership gain for any alt weekly in the nation in 2Q…abruptly folded a week after the CVC numbers came out.

      “publishers should do what cable and satellite TV networks have done for years — charge Internet service providers for carrying their Web sites. The ISPs would then pass the cost on to their subscribers.”

      This is absurd and unworkable. Publishers have no contract with ISPs that would allow them to do anything more than send a bill, and listen to the ISPs laugh. Publishers PAY the ISPs, not the other way around. They are customers for the ‘Net connection just like your house or mine. What in your mind would magically force a change to that?

      Nov 3, 2009 at 10:29 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Keith Kimmel
      Keith Kimmel

      “WRONG, Keith! Only PAID-CIRCULATION print media is dying. FREE-CIRCULATION print media — particularly weekly newspapers — are still very much alive and many are even thriving.”

      I suppose that depends on how you describe thriving. Free papers and alternative news weeklies do well in some areas. But the problem is, how do you qualify just how well they are doing. What defines well? When the company makes money, or the reach and/or significance of its publications? Many free newspapers are not audited by ABC (Audit Bureaus of Circulation – google it) so as an advertiser, all you know is how many papers they PRINT, not how many are actually read.

      Here we have a weekly called The Oklahoma Gazette (OG), which is read pretty widely and paid attention to a little bit. But The Daily Bigot (aka The Oklahoman) is still far more established and far more relied upon. Not saying that OG is unreliable or bad because its free, I am just saying that when it comes down to it, they don’t really have alot of influence. No one really pays attention to who they endorse for elections, etc. Every once in a while they get a major story first (usually investigative in nature) and the establishment media follows them. I chock that up to everyone gets their 15 minutes at some point.

      They still, in general, are followers and not leaders. If you want good entertainment coverage (celebrities, theatre, arts, dining, etc) then by all means pick up a free paper. They usually have far better coverage in those areas. But as far as covering whats really going on, legislative updates, government, elections, politics, who the mayor has his dick stuck in, etc., then you pretty much are stuck with establishment media.

      My worry is once the big shake out happens, what are we going to be left with? I am hoping the vacuum isn’t filled with blogs. Blogs like Queerty and Daily KOS and Urban Conservative do have a place, but if that’s all there was, we’d be in serious trouble.

      Whats really sad about this whole mess is when Regent got rid of Freshmen. I honestly used to love that magazine. I’d anxiously await every new issue in the mailbox. Some of the boys in there were so hawt and the photography was top notch, imho.

      Nov 3, 2009 at 4:31 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Keith Kimmel
      Keith Kimmel

      “And I thought Texas was going to secede. So, what’s all this fuss about Dallas?”

      Oklahoma is supposedly going to join them and establish a Christian nation, a refuge for bigots and . There are about a dozen (give or take) state officals elected here that openly endorse the notion of sucession.

      “publishers should do what cable and satellite TV networks have done for years — charge Internet service providers for carrying their Web sites. The ISPs would then pass the cost on to their subscribers.”

      What you propose there is to defeat net neutrality and let the ISPs decide who gets what. This is hardly a good idea. The great thing about the Internet is that anyone can say whatever they want and its also the biggest problem with the Internet. But the solution is not to put the ISPs in charge of who gets to be seen online. When you think about it, there are a handful of really big ISPs that control most of the nation’s access to the Internet (in most cases, telephone companies and cable companies). And yes, there are many small “indie” ISPs but you can bet that wont be the case if net neutrality is defeated. Just like the phone companies squeezed out the CLEC (competing local exchange carrier) they will squeeze out the mom and pop ISP. In the end, that means no real choice and everything will be reduced to a dozen or so mainstream “packages” just like Cable TV service (which I still don’t subscribe to). Ever called your cable company and said I *just* want LOGO and nothing else? What did they say when they got done laughing?

      And the Internet isn’t free now – it never has been. Everyone pays for a connection. You, me and every other data center and host.

      Nov 3, 2009 at 4:47 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Outsider
      Outsider

      @ Deepthroat,

      Since you had asked about Dallas, here is the latest “news” published by one of our GLBT publications there in that city. Actually, I could hardly call it quality journalism but since Mark Reed is a part of this thread as well and also a star on the video, perhaps he can explain to everyone why Dallas is such a corrupt place for GLBT news and politics. Way to go guys, you are making our media look just dandy !! …………….

      http://www.dallasvoice.com/instant-tea/2009/11/05/qls-wilkinson-vanderslice-get-in-mark-reeds-face-during-last-nights-rally-on-cedar-springs/#comments

      Nov 5, 2009 at 12:03 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • David Williams
      David Williams

      It’s a shame to see The Advocate “dying” or perhaps morphing into an insert for that puff magazine called Out. (What a joke that magazine is: about the only thing it has are pretty boys modeling expensive clothes. Nice to look at, but who can afford all that stuff?)

      When I was coming out in the 70s, The Advocate was a real lifeline for those of us who weren’t living on the coasts. I devoured every issue because it was basically the only NEWS magazine we had, whatever flaws there were. It let us all know there was hope for better times, and it was a true groundbreaker in its day.

      I can understand why it may be going out of business. The print industry itself is hurting terribly. But it’s like watching a good friend gasping for breath on his deathbed. You can’t stand watching him go, but you know it’s pretty much inevitable.

      Nov 7, 2009 at 1:04 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Skeeter Sanders
      Skeeter Sanders

      All of you people who are blaming the rise of the Internet for the demise of The Advocate are missing a very important fact: The Advocate had been on the decline for more than 15 years, having long ago fallen behind local LGBT newspapers in the immediacy and freshness of news.

      With is bi-weekly publication schedule, the news published in The Advocate was already stale — having previously been published in local weekly LGBT newspapers such as The Washington Blade, the Bay Area Reporter (San Francisco), Bay Windows (Boston) and even its hometown rivals in Los Angeles, Frontiers and Update.

      Converting The Advocate into a monthly was an acknowledgement that it simply could no longer compete with the local LGBT weeklies for hard news.

      Of course, with the rise of online publishing, even the local LGBT weeklies — particularly the Blade — are now finding themselves competing against their own Web sites, even though most of the LGBT local weeklies are free-circulation — unlike the paid-circulation Advocate. By now, more people read the LGBT weeklies online than their print editions.

      Then there is unmistakable demographic: YOUNG PEOPLE ARE NO LONGER WILLING TO PAY FOR NEWS IN A PRINTED PUBLICATION THAT WAS POSTED HOURS EARLIER ONLINE THAT THEY CAN READ WITHOUT CHARGE.

      THAT’S the bottom line. And that applies to ALL printed publications.

      Nov 14, 2009 at 12:00 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Leslie
      Leslie

      Hello – I just received a copy of Out Magazine as a substitute for my subscription of UnZipped. How can this company justify this type of substitution? UnZipped – porn / Out – gay fluff! This is rediculous. What do I need to do to get refunded for the subscription that I paid for that is no longer publishing? Anyone with information – please pass it on!

      Thank you!

      May 17, 2010 at 11:10 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • jimstoic
      jimstoic

      I would much rather lose Out, which doesn’t provide anything I can’t get from Details and GQ, than the established national gay news voice that is The Advocate.

      Maybe they should consider resuming the “pink pages” of classified M4M ads in the center. ;-)

      Aug 9, 2010 at 4:26 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Bong Ebbighausen
      Bong Ebbighausen

      I can’t assume I have ever noticed your website using this several remarks about it!

      Nov 10, 2010 at 3:15 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Daniela Navarete
      Daniela Navarete

      Superb posting, well crafted I must say.

      Nov 10, 2010 at 5:01 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·

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