bros culture

Billy Eichner does damage control after accidentally pissing off Gay Twitter™

Billy Eichner has apologized after a recent interview snippet about his upcoming romantic comedy, Bros, rubbed some gay readers the wrong way.

Bros undoubtedly marks a big Hollywood moment. As Eichner said at the VMAs last weekend, it’s the “first gay rom-com ever made by a major studio” and “the first where every role is played by an openly LGBTQ actor.” It’s also notable that the film is getting a theatrical release — an impressive feat for any film in the post-pandemic Hollywood landscape, let alone an explicitly gay one.

Eichner reflected on his big moment in a recent interview with Variety, saying, “I told myself to look around and appreciate how rare and magical this moment is because you are making a movie that looks and feels like all the romantic comedies you grew up loving, but you’re doing it as a gay man.”

Related: Billy Eichner calls out “homophobe” Clarence Thomas in fiery, full-volume VMAs speech

“And this is not an indie movie,” he continued. “This is not some streaming thing which feels disposable, or which is like one of a million Netflix shows. I needed to appreciate that ‘This is a historic moment, and somehow, you’re at the center of it. You helped create it.’”

A portion of the quote was subsequently shared by Variety on Twitter, where many interpreted it as a dig at popular queer streaming titles like Fire IslandHeartstopper or The Half of It — all deserving of the praise they receive.

Variety ultimately deleted the tweet, but not before comments like this started popping up:

The backlash clearly got onto Eichner’s radar, as he soon apologized if he “inadvertently offended or insulted anyone.”

He clarified that he only meant to highlight “the way that, historically, LGBTQ+ content has often been considered niche and disregarded by Hollywood,” rather than dismiss the quality of other, non-theatrical releases.

Here’s his full statement:

Perhaps more talk like this honoring the incredible legacy of LGBTQ storytelling that made a film like Bros possible, and less about how it’s our civic duty to buy tickets, might actually be a better promotional strategy for queer audiences who’ve long supported queer films.

Still, we’re going to chalk this one up to Eichner getting caught up in his well-deserved moment, and we’ll be first in line when tickets go on sale — if not to stick it to Clarence Thomas, then to hopefully be thoroughly entertained.