Fear works

Christian Extremists Rejoice After Houston Votes To Remain Antigay, Rejecting Non-Discrimination Bill By Huge Margin

premium_landscapeThanks to the hard work and dedication of Christian extremists, the city of Houston voted against equal protection for LGBTQ citizens, as well as more than a dozen other minority groups, yesterday.

That’s right, folks. Antigay activists have won the battle in convincing voters to reject HERO, the city’s proposed non-discrimination ordinance.

Related: Matt Bomer, Michael Sam: Vote YES on Prop 1, Houston Equal Rights Ordinance

HERO would have protected LGBTQ people from being discriminated against in matters of employment and housing. But instead, extremists made their argument about men using women’s restrooms, dubbing it the “bathroom bill.”

The ordinance was originally passed 11 to 6 by the Houston city council, and was signed into law by the city’s openly lesbian mayor, Annise Parker. But a gang of antigay Christian extremists quickly banded together to campaign for the measure to be put up for a popular vote, then they got busy misleading voters with ridiculous posters like this one:

hero

Despite having the support of Houston’s business community plus celebrities like Michael Sam and Matt Bomer, as well as both President Obama and 2016 Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton, the “bathroom fear” tactic ended up working. HERO failed 62 to 38 percent.

“I will give full credit to the pastors and the antigay organizers here in Houston,” Mayor Parker told Rolling Stone after the ordinance was voted down yesterday. “They played it masterfully.”

But it’s not just LGBTQ people who are left vulnerable because of HERO’s rejection by voters. The ordinance also protected people against discrimination based on sex, race, color, ethnicity, national origin, age, familial status, marital status, military status, religion, disability, genetic information and pregnancy.

Related: Trans Women Using Women’s Bathrooms Is “Filthy,” “Disgusting” Say Texas Republicans

h/t: The New Civil Rights Movement