hacktivists

Egypt’s ‘Gay Activist’ Author Ahmed Saad Still Wants Homos Killed If They Don’t Try To Turn Straight

Ahmed Saad, the 20-year-old heterosexual Egyptian journalist, insists that he was only trying to help further gay rights — or at least provide a mainstream look at them — by posing to be a homo himself in the process of writing his new novel Shab Takaya, or Lady Boy. But does playing gay on hook-up sites like Manjam.com for the purposes of “research” — and then fictionalizing the stories of the men he met — go too far? Oh please. Saad was just laying the groundwork for a tome that is “the first Egyptian book that seeks to defend homosexuals on the basis of Islam,” reports Al-Masry Al-Youm. “The book’s primary purpose, Saad said during the interview, is to convince its intended audience–heterosexuals in Egyptian society–to sympathize with the plight of Egypt’s homosexuals and put an end to their societal persecution.” But what’s this about still tolerating the execution of gays if they don’t turn straight? That is the real problem.

Released in December, Shab Takaya emphasizes the need of Islamic society to accept gays. But what about gays who refuse to go straight? Off with their heads, apparently.

Yet whether Saad’s work actually helps serve that purpose is a matter of interpretation, which explains why since the book’s publication, Saad has fielded insults not only from homophobic heterosexuals opposed to conciliatory aspects of Saad’s message, but also from homosexuals who believe that the writer’s ideas only serve to further stigmatize them. Based on the writings of the Quran, many Muslims believe that homosexuality is a crime punishable by death. Saad sees this attitude as a disastrous textual misinterpretation, and reminds us that God only punishes those who refuse to atone for their sins. Instead of condemning homosexuals, Saad told Al-Masry Al-Youm, we must “adopt a merciful approach and help them to repent.” Nevertheless, the book suggests the possibility that homosexuals may be executed if they refuse to commit to a heterosexual way of life. If you think homosexuals should be persecuted, he writes, “don’t forget that God” waited until “after they refused his guidance to sentence them to death.”

Yet whether Saad’s work actually helps serve that purpose is a matter of interpretation, which explains why since the book’s publication, Saad has fielded insults not only from homophobic heterosexuals opposed to conciliatory aspects of Saad’s message, but also from homosexuals who believe that the writer’s ideas only serve to further stigmatize them. Based on the writings of the Quran, many Muslims believe that homosexuality is a crime punishable by death. Saad sees this attitude as a disastrous textual misinterpretation, and reminds us that God only punishes those who refuse to atone for their sins. Instead of condemning homosexuals, Saad told Al-Masry Al-Youm, we must “adopt a merciful approach and help them to repent.” Nevertheless, the book suggests the possibility that homosexuals may be executed if they refuse to commit to a heterosexual way of life. If you think homosexuals should be persecuted, he writes, “don’t forget that God” waited until “after they refused his guidance to sentence them to death.”

Is this the best we can expect out of Egypt, a country where homosexuality, while not explicitly illegal, is criminalized under “immoral and indecent behavior” regulations?: A self-professed “gay activist” who actually does not want gay people to be accepted, but to turn straight. “I do not support homosexuals who do not want to change,” says Saad. “I support those who do. I know that my view isn’t Western and may seem backward to you, but it’s my belief.”