exclusions

Lady Gaga: Repeal DADT. Oh, And Kick Out The Straight Soldiers Who Don’t Like Gays

Lady Gaga, going slightly off script from Gay Inc.’s strict message of just repealing Don’t Ask Don’t Tell, proposed a new law today: discharging soldiers who don’t believe in equality for LGBT service members. Jeez, hope the senators have time to mark up that language before tomorrow’s vote!

“Go home!” she screamed today in Portland, Maine at these anti-equality types, comparing the debate over letting gays serve openly to cheap cafeteria food vs. prime rib, which, ugh, was a pretty flat and uninspiring argument. (It went like this: “Equality is the prime rib of America … of what we stand for as a nation. And I don’t get to enjoy the greatest cut of meat that my country has to offer. ARE YOU LISTENING?!” Okay lady.)

Yes, Gaga screamed for the repeal of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell, but she spent an equal amount of time railing against the soldiers who — folks like Sen. John McCain keep telling us — will freak out if they know their comrades are gay. Because they shouldn’t be allowed to serve, says Ms. Stefani Germanotta, 24.

Gaga is a wonderful live performer. She makes some very interesting music videos. She’s not, however, the best orator, and she showed that today. But that’s besides the point really. She got the cable networks tuned in. She mobilizes young people, even those who can’t vote, to start learning about and educating others about these issues. And she generates an enormous amount of interest in a civil rights matter that the millions of dollars in Gay Inc. budgets could never hope for.

So: Today’s speech was a little ridiculous, yes. But its effectiveness won’t be measured in whether Sens. Olympia Snowe and Susan Collins help pass the DADT compromise attached to the Defense Department’s spending bill, because one pop singer doesn’t have that power, little monsters. Whether Gaga is an effective gay advocate — a title I believe she’s already earned — will be seen in whether her tween fans are the ones explaining to their parents why they need to pick up the phone and call their lawmakers.