sexuality ed

NOM’s Claim That Schools Are Teaching Kids About Gay Marriage Is A Lie. But It Shouldn’t Be

Continuing its strategy of scaring families into thinking same-sex marriage will lead to the recruitment of their children into the homosexual lifestyle, the National Organization for Marriage has been mailing out brochures to Rhode Island voters claiming “Imposing same-sex marriage has consequences,” consequences that allegedly include, “Massachusetts’ public schools teach kids as young as kindergartners about gay marriage. Parents have no legal right to object!” PolitiFact has already debunked NOM’s myth, and bully for them! But whenever I hear these sorts of arguments, however misleading, I always come back to: Yeah, so? What if NOM’s claim is true?

So what if schools are telling children about gay marriages? And that they’re legal in some states, and illegal and others. And that they’re the unions of two loving people. Teachers are not telling students AND THEN THE TWO MEN FUCK EACH OTHER IN THE ASSHOLE, the same way they aren’t teaching “kids as young as kindergartners” that mommy spreads her legs for daddy’s third leg.

Christopher Plante, NOM’s Rhode Island chapter head, has been making this scary argument at least as long as I remember first hearing his name. (It’s usually accompanied by evidence of fag books found in school libraries.) But it’s time to stop playing this game about how NOM is somehow wrong about what gay marriage means for kids in school. We already know this is an organization that will distort the truth, outright lie, and distract its intended audience in any way necessary to get them to be scared of LGBTs. See the above ad the group is running in Rhode Island.

Instead, we could only hope NOM is right: that teachers and administrators feel comfortable enough about same-sex marriage to relay to kids that, hey, yeah, this is something that’s happening out there, and it’s perfectly okay. It’s not enough to say NOM’s claims are unfounded. It’s time to say the only reasonable way to move forward is to normalize same-sex marriage in the eyes of kids, at least as much as they see opposite-sex marriage as de rigueur.

We continue to play by NOM’s rules, refuting their claims and reacting, instead of acting. Which, sometimes, is necessary. But that can’t be our game plan to change hearts and minds. We’ll be a lot further along when we show that kids really don’t have a problem with gay couples, even married ones, and there is nothing to be scared of.