AIDS IN AMERICA

STUDY: CDC Report Shows HIV Infection In Gay Men On The Rise

Incidence-fact-sheet-figure2There’s good and bad news from a report on HIV infection released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The annual number of new infections in the U.S. has remained stable despite continued increases in the number of people living with HIV, which according to the CDC, “[indicates] that HIV testing, treatment and prevention programs are making an important impact. But infections rates persist “at far too high a level,” according to the Atlanta-based organization.

Some key findings in the CDC’s HIV Supplemental Surveillance Report:

* Overall, the number of new HIV infections in the United States has remained stable at about  50,000 per year over the last decade. (In 2010, there were 47,500 new infections.)

* This is the first CDC incidence report to show a statistically significant decline in new infections among African American women (21% comparing 2008 to 2010). However African American women continue to represent the majority (64%) of new infections among women

* New infections among young gay and bisexual men (ages 13-24) continued to rise sharply (by 22% comparing 2008 to 2010)

* Young, black gay and bisexual men continue to bear the heaviest burden and now account for more new infections than any other subgroup – a total of 4,800 in 2010

* Gay and bisexual men represent 2% of the U.S. population but a majority (63%) of new HIV infections, and the number of new infections in this group increased 12% comparing 2008 to 2010

* African Americans represent 14% of the U.S. population but almost half (44%) of new infections; the number of new infections remained stable comparing 2008 to 2010

* Latinos represent 16% of the U.S. population but 21% of new infections; the number of new infections remained stable comparing 2008 to 2010

Examining data from 2010, the study provides the most up-to-date picture of the U.S. HIV epidemic.