Equality Index

UPDATE: The 18 Countries Where You Can Now (Or Soon) Get Hitched

marriage equality countries1UPDATE:

There are 18 countries that extend their marriage rights to same-sex couples, and 2 (Mexico and the US) that have regional or court-directed laws in place. Here’s the chronological list of the countries that make up the legal gay rainbow as of January 2014, plus the GayCities exclusive insider guides.

NETHERLANDS – April 21, 2001
BELGIUM – June 1, 2003
SPAIN – July 3, 2005
CANADA – July 20, 2005
SOUTH AFRICA – November 30, 2006
NORWAY – January 1, 2009
SWEDEN – May 1, 2009
PORTUGAL – June 5, 2010
ICELAND – June 22, 2010
ARGENTINA – July 22, 2010
DENMARK – June 15, 2012
BRAZIL – May 14, 2013
FRANCE – May 29, 2013
URUGUAY – June 19, 2013
COLOMBIA – June 20, 2013
NEW ZEALAND – August 19, 2013
ENGLAND – 2014*
WALES – 2014*

*Date in Summer 2014.

ORIGINAL STORY (July 23, 2013): With the American marriage equality train kicking into hyperdrive, it’s worth remembering that the nation still lags behind much of the modern world when it comes to nuptial fairness.

Like Mexico, the U.S.  now allows same-sex marriage in some states. Likewise across the pond, the Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Act 2013 received the Queen’s blessing on July 17, and is expected to take effect in the middle of next year – but this will only allow same-sex marriages in England and Wales, and not the entire United Kingdom. But in 15 countries across the planet, marriage is now a federal right.

What follows is Queerty’s rundown of the countries that already have – or are very soon to get – full marriage equality, and some tidbits about their local laws and statistics. You may notice a critical trend here: The nations with full marriage equality tend to also be the most democratic and the most protective of minority rights, as well as boasting the lowest infant mortality rates and, yes, the richest citizenries per capita – by far.