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SHOCK: Lesbian Air Force Lieutenant Comes Out And Is Denied a Discharge

Lt. Robin R. Chaurasiya, now 24 and stationed in Illinois, was just done with the Air Force. She left active duty in 2007, after joining ROTC as a 17-year-old, but thanks to those wars going on, was recalled in 2009. And it’s not that she wasn’t committed to serving her country. It’s that she didn’t want to serve her country when her country wouldn’t serve her — as an equal. But even after her superiors were made aware of her sexuality, and that she had a civil union with a woman, they refused to discharge her. Because, they claimed, she had gone gay just to get out.

Lt. Gen. Robert R. Allardice, Chaurasiya’s commander at Scott Air Force Base in Illinois, could have easily swept her out of the armed forces based on her declaration of being gay, and engaging in HOMOSEXUAL CONDUCT! But Allardice refused, because he believed, or at least filled out the paperwork asserting as much, that Chaurasiya was using her civil union just to duck service.

In his Feb. 25 decision ending any administrative discharge action against Chaurasiya, Allardice cited a section of the “don’t ask, don’t tell” law that allows military commanders to keep service members on active duty if they married a person of the same sex for the purpose of getting out of the military.

Like many cases, Chaurasiya’s situation is complicated. She had left active duty in 2007 after serving one year, but was recalled to active duty in 2009. After she was sent to Scott Air Force Base, a male former service member she had once dated forwarded to her commander a group e-mail in which Chaurasiya had written that she was a lesbian. After an investigation, Chaurasiya submitted a memorandum to her commander declaring herself a lesbian.

“I want to be respected for it, and if I am going to be disrespected I don’t want to be here,” Chaurasiya said in an interview. Chaurasiya said she did not enter into the union or declare herself a lesbian to get a discharge. “My intention is not to get out,” she said. “But if I am going to be kept in and treated unfairly either from my peers or by the military itself . . . then I want to be loud about it to bring about the change, or I do not want to be here.”

So there you have it: If a soldier declares herself to be gay but still wants to serve, she can be dismissed. If she declares herself to be gay but wants to leave, she must stay.

Here’s the first letter Chaurasiya wrote Lt. Allardice:

Approximately one week ago, you read me an email that was forwarded to you, purportedly from me, stating that I was homosexual. You then stated that you would be upset if someone was “making claims against my character” and that you would not believe I wrote this email unless I raised my hand, looked you in the eye, and told you I was gay. This upset me tremendously, as I did not understand why someone’s homosexuality would impugn their character as you described. However, increasingly, I realize that in order to live up to the Air Force’s core value of “integrity first,” I need to be honest about my sexual orientation. Therefore, I am writing this memorandum to inform you that I am homosexual. For years, I was forced to choose between being in the military and hiding my sexual orientation or not serving in the military and being honest about my sexual orientation. After years of choosing the first option, I feel that I can no longer adequately and honestly serve as an officer in the U.S. Air Force.

I have been dating females since I was thirteen years old. Throughout my affiliation with the military, though, I have tried to conceal my orientation. Over the past year, however, surrounded by supportive communities and separated from the military’s homophobic culture, I have been able to live more openly. Since coming back onto active duty, though, my attempts to conceal my orientation have tremendously impacted my abilities to function both at work and in my personal life, causing me stress beyond a manageable level. ….

I do not foresee myself being able to honestly, openly and successfully fulfill my duties as an officer while being forced to conceal who I am. The past month has reinforced for me how difficult it will be to conceal my sexuality and my future relationships, as well as the stress that my attempts to do so will cause. Thus, while I am willing to serve my country, it must be openly…..

I also understand that under the “Don’t Ask. Don’t Tell. Don’t Pursue. Don’t Harass,” military regulations, directives, and policies, I am not to be asked questions about sexual behavior [Secretary of Defense (Personnel & Readiness) Memo, 12 August 1999: Implementation of Recommendations Concerning Homosexual Conduct Policy], and that you will act to prevent any harassment or other discrimination against me while my discharge is being processed.

Here’s Lt. Allardice’s reply memo:

By:           editor editor
On:           Apr 5, 2010
Tagged: , , ,

  • 11 Comments
    • afrolito
      afrolito

      They should keep her in there forever.

      So sick of these gays and there obsession with serving in the military. They should also get her a proactiv prescription. Her face is painful to look at.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 10:36 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Synnerman
      Synnerman

      And you should scamper back to Freeperville Afrolito.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 11:23 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Jason
      Jason

      @afrolito: FAIL.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 11:39 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Sam
      Sam

      Christ, this Catch-22 bullshit is so tired. How can this possibly help America? On the bright side, I suppose Robin’s now been given free reign to serve openly (since they don’t believe her or whatever), so that should take care of the stress she talked about in her letter. Good on her for pointing out that DADT also protects her from harassment. If they force her to stay in the military only to be treated like crap for being gay, she seems like the type to raise hell about it.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 12:32 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • J. Clarence
      J. Clarence

      So in other words it’s damned if you do, damned if you don’t when it comes to gays in the military and Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell. That’s a bitch.

      The lieutenant’s actions is not at all surprising though. Since the wars started more and more people are being recalled and then there is that whole stop-loss nonsense. If just saying you are gay and marrying another chick or dude of the same sex as you was an automatic dismissal more people would have been doing it ages ago.

      Though from a gay-rights perspective that would have probably led to this policy being over and done with much quicker.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 12:35 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • biguy
      biguy

      Her and her partner should make a sex tape and submit it as evidence of her homosexual conduct.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 2:31 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Glenn I
      Glenn I

      Yeah, the only bright side is that the Lt. won’t be lying anymore.

      A spark in the darkness.

      Apr 5, 2010 at 7:14 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Kevin
      Kevin

      Just a quick aside: Lieutenant General is not even close to the same thing as a “Lt.” and if you’re going to shorten it it would be “Gen.” or “LTG”

      Apr 5, 2010 at 11:48 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • DeeJay
      DeeJay

      The real issue here is that she was ok with signing up and claiming she was straight, in order to get her four years of college paid for through a ROTC scholarship. Now she doesn’t want to fulfill her commitment so she wants a discharge. She knew what she was getting into when she accepted all that free money and school. Now finish your commitment and then get out and live as you like.

      Apr 6, 2010 at 10:33 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • A now confused John from England(used to be just John but there are other John's)
      A now confused John from England(used to be just John but there are other John's)

      @DeeJay:

      Oh shut up. That means eff all. Why did they discharge all those other people?

      PUR-LEASE, she’s an asset. You read the damn note. The Army is business people.

      And I would also bet that women get away with this more then men.

      Apr 6, 2010 at 11:26 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Dionte
      Dionte

      I’ve been accused of being heterosexual before, it’s not a good feeling.

      Apr 7, 2010 at 1:27 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·

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