Brian Currie

‘Does a victim who doesn’t belong to any of these groups feel less pain when they are beaten up, stabbed or slashed?’

VIEWPOINTS — “If you are white, heterosexual, not religious, don’t work for the emergency services and are not disabled, you’ve just become a minority group in Scotland. In the eyes of the Scottish Parliament, if you belong to the above grouping and you are the victim of an assault – verbal or physical – the courts don’t have to treat your attacker as harshly as they would otherwise. That is the outcome of the latest piece of law-making by MSPs who have just extended existing hate crime laws on race and religion to cover disabled people and the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender communities. […] It is abhorrent that members of the gay community have been assaulted or killed because of who they are, and it is barely credible that disabled people would be victims of assault. […] The extremists and idiots who perpetrate these crimes are an affront to Scotland and they deserve to be treated harshly by the courts. But does a victim who doesn’t belong to any of these groups feel less pain when they are beaten up, stabbed or slashed?” — Brian Currie, arguing in the Scotland Herald about how hate crimes laws don’t protect the privileged