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Because Of Prop 8, Ed Watson Literally Died Waiting To Marry His Partner Of 40 Years

Bust out your Kleenex for the sad tale of Derence Kernek and Ed Watson, an elederly California couple who wanted to have a legal marriage ceremony before Watson’s rapidly progressing Alzheimer’s disease wiped out his ability to remember the service, the commitments and their 40 years together. Yesterday, Mr. Watson died at the age of 78, and thanks to Prop 8, he passed away still waiting for a chance to marry the man he loved.

Being denied the chance to marry the person you love adds insult to the already hard experience of being an elderly LGBT person. Make no mistake, Ed Watson was not the only older gay person still waiting for a little dignity and love in his golden years. Many like him exist, and many like him will pass before they get a chance to wed the one they care for most.

By:           Daniel Villarreal
On:           Dec 9, 2011
Tagged: , ,
  • 11 Comments
    • Jeff
      Jeff

      Rest in peace. Why didn’t they have it when same gender marriage was legal in CA? That’s what a friend of mine who is partnered did.

      Dec 10, 2011 at 1:26 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • 13Zeroither
      13Zeroither

      @Jeff I don’t know, but either way it sucks.

      Dec 10, 2011 at 2:49 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • bagooka
      bagooka

      That’s too bad.

      Dec 10, 2011 at 3:20 am · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Carl
      Carl

      @Jeff: Given they have desired it for so long, I would wager there were external issues that prevented it – medical perhaps?

      Dec 10, 2011 at 1:16 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Bill Ford
      Bill Ford

      I think the point is, gay people shouldn’t have to rush under time constraints to do something straight people take for granted. RIP.

      Dec 10, 2011 at 2:40 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Kurt
      Kurt

      Queerty suggests that marriage gives dignity to love. I have no dispute with that. But it is counter to the views of much of cultural :eft from the late sixties until recent times, including many gay activists. Just saying…

      Dec 10, 2011 at 6:18 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • ewe
      ewe

      I for one consider them married. I hope he didn’t suffer too much. Alheimers is insidious.

      Dec 10, 2011 at 8:39 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Panserbjorne
      Panserbjorne

      Questions and philosophizing aside: These two men loved each other, and they wanted to be married. And that didn’t happen because cruel, evil, soulless douchebags were intent on trying to rob them of equal rights and human dignity. My heart weeps for them–but this is also the source of the explosive anger that wells up inside me in the face of anti-LGBT bigots. The countless number of people they’ve hurt, the countless tears they’ve caused, the untold numbers of death, and all the suffering…all because some selfish pricks can’t live and let live. It may or may not be a good excuse, but this is exactly why I wish pain and death upon those who stand in the way of equality, and why I can’t and won’t apologize for that. Evil douchebags deserve to get what’s coming to them for what they have done to all the innocent folks like Derence Kernek and Ed Watson, whose one go ’round on this earth was marred by their hatred and contempt of bigots who count among their “rights” the ability to destroy the dreams of others.

      Dec 10, 2011 at 10:22 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Shannon1981
      Shannon1981

      I just hope his last days were peaceful and filled with love. May he rest in peace.

      Dec 10, 2011 at 11:23 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • scribe31
      scribe31

      @Shannon1981: I don’t worry about the partner that passed on, because in my mind he is in a safe beautiful place.If there is a heaven it should be filled with awesome people like him. My heart sinks for the partner left behind. I have been with my partner for 17 years and could not imagine what I would do if he passed, and I am 37. What do you do when you spend 40 years with a person and they pass? How to you move on in your sixties?

      Dec 11, 2011 at 12:09 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·
    • Shannon1981
      Shannon1981

      @scribe31: Good point. Many elderly people who lose their spouses go downhill quickly after that. Hope that isn’t the case here…

      Dec 11, 2011 at 12:41 pm · @ReplyReply to this comment ·

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