school's out

Why Isn’t Morehouse Focused On Fostering Acceptance, Not Division?

Xem Van Adams runs a celebrity blog, but don’t hold it against him. Because the Los Angeles-via-Baltimore writer is also an outspoken fella on race, sexuality, masculinity — and this bullshit at Morehouse College.

“Going through Morehouse’s yearbook, it’s just like going through my Facebook friends list,” says Van Adams, establishing his cred to speak on the topic.

Morehouse, you’ll recall, banned its all-male campus from wearing women’s clothing, along with pajamas and do-rags. It’s all part of grooming students at the historically black college to become upstanding citizens.

That mission is an admirable one, but don’t all schools want, in addition to cashing tuition checks, for their student bodies to succeed in life? As a HBCU, Morehouse is especially concerned with fostering a regiment of classy black men. That, too, we can get behind.

But as Van Adams points out, this institutionalized prescription for what qualifies as “upstanding” actually weakens the entire mission. Morehouse should be concentrating on producing graduates who aren’t just successful in their careers, but who are accepting of their brothers (and sisters) who may not fit into the very norms Morehouse recommends.

Unless, of course, the real underly message of this policy is: no thugs, and no gays allowed.