LOST IN TRANSLATION

IOC President Jacques Rogge Demands Clarification Of “Gay Propaganda” Laws

RoggeAFP_2284647bThere’s been much confusion regarding Russia’s “gay propaganda” laws and how they’ll apply to tourists, members of the media, and athletes during the 2014 Olympic Games in Sochi.

The IOC originally claimed that anti-gay laws would have no bearing on those traveling to the city next year, but some Russian officials stirred up doubt with their own interpretation of how the laws may apply to foreigners.

This week, Olympic president Jacques Rogge (above) has demanded clarification by asking Dmitry Kozak—the Russian politician who organized the Games—to offer “written confirmation of reassurances.” Kozak was the original source that claimed Russian law would not apply to foreigners, though he has no influence over the implementation of such policy.

At a news conference in Moscow on Monday, Rogge suggested that details may have been lost in translation:

“We have received all reassurances emanating from Mr Dmitry Kozak, who is in charge of the organisation of the Games in Sochi. We asked for written confirmation of these reassurances. We received them yesterday, we have studied it this morning but there are still uncertainties and we have decided to ask for more clarification as of today. So we are waiting for this clarification before having final judgement on these reassurances.”

Oh, right. That must be it. The language.

This is coming from the man who also promised the world that coverage of the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing would not be censored by the Chinese government. It was.

But you can’t fault the old buzzard. Language has never really been his strong suit.