Shocker

New study reveals police stop LGBTQ people at a much higher rate

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A new study by the Williams Institute at the UCLA School of Law has revealed that queer people are six times more likely than the general population to be stopped by police.

The results come as a group of experts analyzed data from the Police Public Contact Survey, a study by the Bureau of Justice Statistics which collects data on police conduct, and from the Generations Study, a three-generation study of the lives of LGBTQ people.

Among the most shocking results: 6% of LGBTQ people reported being stopped in a public space, as opposed to just 1% of the general population.

“The much higher rates of LGBQ adults reporting being approached by the police is consistent with the idea that LGBQ people are over-policed and raises the issue of bias-based profiling of LGBT communities in general,” the study authors noted in their conclusion.

Related: Police groups are banned from participating in New York City Pride “effective immediately”

Other statistics also reveal a higher level of police interaction. 19% of LGBTQ people reported being stopped while driving as opposed to just 8% of the general population. Those findings also hold regardless of race or gender.

22% of queer people also reported seeking help from police as opposed to just 11% of the general populace.

In general, queer people reported satisfaction with police response, though not quite as many as the general population. 81% reported that they felt police acted appropriately in their interactions, down from 91% among the general population. Women, in particular, reported a higher level of dissatisfaction: 69% of LGBTQ women reported feeling satisfied as opposed to 85% of women in general. In fact, one in five LGBTQ women reported they would hesitate to contact police in the future due to a negative experience.

The survey results come amid a precarious debate over policing in the United States. 2020 saw #BlackLivesMatter protests erupt nationwide in response to the killing of a number of unarmed men and women of color. Earlier this month, New York City pride announced it would exclude a police presence from pride events this year.