FILM BUFF

Chris Pratt Loves To Get Naked, Doesn’t Understand How Taking Out His Junk Could Offend

Screen Shot 2015-05-20 at 9.16.59 AMDon’t try to put Chris Pratt in a box. Not because he’s a multi-talented performer and comedian (which he is), but because when you come back to let him out, he’ll probably be naked.

On second thought, put Chris Pratt in a box.

The actor recently shed some insight on his propensity to shed his pants. He told GQ:

“I was a jokester, I had a dirty mind, and a dirty sense of humor. I was naked all the time. It was just recently, in the last few years since I’ve become an adult, that I’ve learned to keep my clothes on.”

Unfortunately, his lesson in staying clothed seems to line up chronologically with attaining that crazy action-star body.

But please, go on:

“I got suspended from the track team in high school for getting naked on the track bus,” he recalled. “I was always getting naked. I thought it was hilarious. I didn’t understand how somebody could be so offended by me just taking my junk out.”

We’re with you there, Chris.

He goes on to recall a scene in Parks and Rec in which he stripped down unscripted. He was asked to shock Amy Poehler, and shock her he did.

“HR sent me a letter. Someone obviously must have complained about it or something. I guess now that I don’t work for them, I can make fun of it, but part of the letter was saying, like, ‘Also, don’t mock this. Just so we’re clear, you’re being reprimanded, and don’t go around talking about how this is funny,’” Pratt revealed. “[It was] the take they f**king used, by the way, that made the air, and was hilarious, so I was totally right, but apparently if you want to get naked there’s certain protocols you have to take to prevent people from being offended — you have to give them the opportunity to not see it.”

But that’s just not the way Chris operates:

“But that’s how I was in high school, too,” he continued. “I remember walking into the coach’s office with just a sock on. Not on my feet. And I was like, ‘Hey, Coach, can I talk to you?’ And they were like, ‘Jesus, God!’ I liked making people feel uncomfortable.”