Let’s Celebrate ‘National Drag Queen History Month’

drag-queenDid you know that January is National Drag History Month? Of course you didn’t, because it’s just some thing that Logo made up to try to trick you into watching their boring programming and promo the upcoming RuPaul’s Drag Race. They went through all the trouble of creating a logo (small “l”) for it and everything, though, so let’s all pretend that it’s “National Drag History Month” for a minute or two so as not to hurt Logo’s (big “L”) feelings.

Why this sudden burst of charity? Well, with the Media End Times upon us, it just seems wrong to kick a girl when she’s down. So, this one’s for you Dying-Uninteresting-Gay-Media-Company-We-Never-Watch! Happy Drag History Month!

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First up, is a series of instructional videos that teach you how to get that drag queen look. Great idea, terrible execution. Charitably, you could say they’re going for a Brenda Dickson “Welcome to My Home” vibe, what with all the stiff-acting single-camera narration. It’s sort of amazing that you can make turning a boy into a drag queen boring, but hey, this is serious, historical stuff. No fun allowed.

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As mentioned, the real point of National Drag History month is not to cover, you know, the history of drag queens, but to promo Logo’s latest bid to save itself, RuPaul’s Drag Race. Wisely, the network decided to farm out the production to World of Wonder, so the show looks like something created in the last decade. We’re actually totally geeked for a drag version of ANTM, and considering what a mess Ru has been every time we’ve met him, our hopes for hijinks and drama are very high. See, made up holidays do work as promotion!

And since Logo isn’t actually doing anything about actual drag queen history, here’s a short documentary called Lipstick Boys, which actually is a fascinating look at the history of drag performance, from the Elizabethan times to today. The documentary pays special attention to Julian Eltinge, the famous vaudeville female impersonator and the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence, who have turned drag into a public service.