Rumors

The Sultan of Brunei’s son is very gay-friendly apparently, but is he gay?

Prince Azim, Brunei, gay
Prince Azim of Brunei

Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah of Brunei, whose country newly implemented a law punishing gay sex with death by stoning, has a 36-year-old elder son named Prince Azim who has partied before with queer celebs like gay skiier Gus Kenworthy, trans conservative Caitlyn Jenner, an pro-LGBTQ pop-singer Mariah Carey, raising some eyebrows.

Blogger Perez Hilton recently claimed that Azim is a “big old homo” and “a big flamer,” but you should probably take that with a grain of salt until we get better confirmation.

Prince Azim is reportedly the fourth in line to the throne. Newsweek reports:

Azim, who often produces movies, is known for throwing lavish parties…. [In 2017,] Kenworthy posted a selfie to Instagram with his boyfriend Matthew Wilkas and fellow attendee Caitlyn Jenner… [at one of Azim’s parties]. PerezHilton.com shared a screengrab of Kenworthy’s picture at the time and claimed the athlete promptly deleted the photo from Instagram.

The website Hornet recently posted a link claiming that Azim is gay, but the Newsweek story that it led to made no such claim.

Prince Aziz, gay, Hornet, link
The editor of Hornet posted a link calling Prince Aziz gay, though the link only led to a Newsweek article which made no such claim.

In a video posted this week, blogger Perez Hilton claimed that Prince Azim is gay, but stopped short of offering specifics. Here is Hilton’s video below:

“Y’all know I don’t out people anymore,” he said. “I used to do that back in the day but I’m making an exception here. I’m guessing the Sultan of Brunei doesn’t know that his son, Prince Azim, is a big old homo. I would know because I have spent time with Prince Azim.”

“It’s so hypocritical. This guy’s son is a big flamer, and now he’s enacted a law to stone to death gay men or women, and people who are heterosexual who commit adultery,” he added.

A regional activist recently said that boycotts of the Sultan’s hotels won’t help the country’s LGBTQ community as much as elevating the voices of people who live there.

Reports of gay life in Brunei say that gay people “lay low,” living in the closet, barely patronizing Brunei’s clandestine gay bars and refusing to discuss gay life in general.

One gay man in Brunei recently told The Guardian that it’s unlikely that any gay people will actually be stoned to death under the homophobic law because the law has a “high burden of proof, requiring a confession, or at least four credible witnesses to a criminalized act, [meaning] it won’t be easy to prosecute.”

However, the man worried that the law will embolden homophobes into hunting queer people in the streets.