reviews you can use

The People I’ve Slept With Is 896,342X Funnier, Hotter & Gayer Than Knocked Up

REVIEWS YOU CAN USE Far too often you’ll read a 1,500-word movie review and still wonder whether you should pay good money to see the film. We’re trying to fix that problem.

WHAT’S IT ABOUT?: Angela Yang loves sex. She has slept with hundreds of guys and girls and has a fat stack of Polaroids to prove it. She doesn’t want an LTR like her gay BFF or a spouse like her judgemental sister… that is, until she suddenly ends up pregnant. Then Angela must revisit five lovers from her photo stack to discover her baby’s daddy and whether he can “make an honest woman” out of her.

WHO’S IN IT?: Most notably the film stars Wilson Cruz who played Enrique “Rickie” Vasquez on the TV series My So-Called Life. He grew up to become a ripped mega-hot piece of eye candy; he plays Angela’s slutty but well-intentioned friend.

IS IT ANY GOOD?: Yeah. Angela (played by Karin Anna Cheung) is self-empowered and proudly unapologetic bisexual slut, which is a welcome change from the chaste damsels we normally get in rom-coms. She downs shots, makes out with the hot ginger barmaid and hooks with the cute jock in the toilet. Plus the sex in the film is actually sexy instead just a punchline or plot device. Even when she ends up pregnant she regrets her carelessness, not her sluttiness. Furthermore, she at least considers having an abortion, something Judd Apatow’s Knocked Up was too chicken shit to even call by name. God, I hated that stupid fucking movie.

WHAT’S BAD ABOUT IT?: Angela’s older sister (Lynn Chen) comes off as screechy and one-dimensional; her plucky, happy-go-lucky dad (James Shigeta) plays a fun-loving but wise Asian father who dispenses life-changing advice — sweet but cliche.

FUN FACT: From director Quentin Lee: “The People I’ve Slept With is an Asian-American film in many respects. It was written, directed, and produced by Asian-Americans. It was financed by Asian-American and Asian investors. Our crew was mostly Asian-American. Our cast was also very Asian-American. So you’d say People is an Asian-American film from ground up. But we weren’t really interested in making an issue film about identity politics. We wanted to make an entertaining and funny film with something for everyone. And hopefully we did that. Whether we are Asian or gay or not, we all struggle to find and accept ourselves. And the theme of self-acceptance is pretty universal I think.”

RATING: Three out of five dirty Polaroids: The film is consistently funny, very sexy, and has lots of surprises. Several flat performances and the “all’s well” ending make it a bit saccharine, but they don’t distract too much from the slutty and satisfying (w)hole.