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Watch this TV anchorwoman handle two transphobes like a total boss

Anchorwoman Olayemi Olurin left two transphobic contributors talking in circles yesterday on The Hill TV.

Fellow commentators Robby “Haircut with Eyes” Soave and Kim “Interruption” Iversen spent the entire segment emphatically wondering why they weren’t “allowed” to deadname Elliot Page in the public eye.

Meanwhile, Olurin stuck to her guns and remained the sole voice on the panel to understand the concepts of basic respect and personhood.

It should be noted that this good faith mentioning of Page’s former life that got someone kicked from Twitter doesn’t exist.

They’re speaking about Jordan Peterson and Dave Rubin’s Twitter suspensions over deadnaming the actor, and their statements were anything but in good faith.

Peterson’s original statement read, “Remember when pride was a sin? And Ellen Page just had her breasts removed by a criminal physician.”

To argue for statements like this to remain on the app in spite of Twitter’s long-standing anti-harassment rules is to blatantly call for the admission of violent rhetoric against trans people.

Related: Elon Musk just reminded everyone why his trans daughter wants nothing to do with him

Olurin was the only one to emphasize, nearly ad nauseam, that it’s dehumanizing to refer to someone as something they have publicly stated makes them uncomfortable to be referred to as.

After the show, Iversen went on social media to compare the situation to Muhammad Ali’s name change, saying that people are “ALLOWED” to call him by his birth name.

Another user quickly and eloquently responded by pointing out how Ali handled people who called him by his birth name:

Even though Olurin handled the two transphobic commentators with calm and purpose, it’s embarrassing that she had to explain this concept to two grown adults who continue (still) to act like they don’t understand how calling a person out of their name is disrespectful.

Related: Elliot Page shares dreamy new passport picture that he “never thought” he would love

The pair’s emphasis on not being “allowed” to say Page’s deadname brings to mind a scene from The Good Fight about another word a panel of anchors felt they weren’t allowed to say:

Transphobes like Iversen and Soave are allowed to say whatever they want. They just better be ready to face the repercussions.