Stop the Bullying

Why Did GLAAD Pick Purple As The Color To Wear For Spirit Day?

We’re totally down with the idea of a day dedicated to supporting gay youth and taking a stand against bullying. So down, in fact, that we’re colored Queerty purple to support the effort. (Okay, it’s not even that much worse a color than our regular orange!) And we get that having everyone wear the same color on Spirit Day, being held this Thursday, October 20. But did it have to be purple?

Not many of us can pull that color off.

In a recent press release, GLAAD spokesman Rich Ferraro explains:

Millions of Americans wear purple on Spirit Day as a sign of support for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) youth and to speak out against bullying.

Spirit Day was started in 2010 by teenager Brittany McMillan as a response to the young people who had taken their own lives. Observed annually on October 20, individuals, schools, organizations, corporations, media professionals and celebrities wear purple, which symbolizes spirit on the rainbow flag. Getting involved is easy: Participants are asked to simply “go purple” on October 20 as we work to create a world in which LGBT teens are celebrated and accepted for who they are.

MTV is turning their on-air logo purple and stars like Ricky Martin, Julianne Moore, Joy Behar, Conan O’Brien, Wendy Williams and Chaz Bono have agreed to go eggplant in solidarity with bullied kids.

Hey, don’t get us wrong—we love purple. Queerty turns purple today. We cried during The Color Purple (the book and the movie, not the Broadway show). We have Jenny Joseph’s poem “When I am an Old Woman I Shall Wear Purple” on our fridge. Heck, we think Leo should’ve won an Oscar for What’s Eating Gilbert Grape!

Image via Yahoo