unexpected

Heartbreaking: The worst senator you know just made a great point

Texas embarrassment Ted Cruz said something shockingly reasonable this week — or, at the very least, a spokesperson of his did.

The Cruz camp recently voiced the senator’s apparent support for repealing the archaic, still-on-the-books sodomy ban in Texas.

“Consenting adults should be able to do what they wish in their private sexual activity, and government has no business in their bedrooms,” the spokesperson told The Dallas Morning News.

This law and those like it around the country were all rendered unenforceable by the Supreme Court in its Lawrence v. Texas ruling in 2003, but have still remained dormant in their state’s crime codes.

Related: Ted Cruz says Supreme Court “clearly wrong” on same-sex marriage ruling

To be clear, the senator won’t be winning any GLAAD awards any time soon; he’s openly called the legalization of gay marriage “clearly wrong,” mocked personal pronouns, objected to trans athletes and trans youth, and racked up a laundry list of other anti-queer infractions.

However, in this one specific instance, he somehow cleared the unspeakably low bar that some of his conservative peers have run headfirst into.

For instance, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton recently made it clear that, given the chance, he would be completely “willing and able” to enforce sodomy laws in the state once again.

The repeal of currently inactive sodomy laws is especially prescient in the aftermath of the SCOTUS ruling on Roe v. Wade, which saw folks like Judge Clarence Thomas calling Lawrence ruling into question.

Related: Ted Cruz tries to mock queer people by announcing his new pronouns, looks like a complete idiot instead

The repeal of Roe v. Wade and the threat its new precedent makes to rulings like Obergefell and Lawrence have led to legislative reevaluations across the nation; just recently, “homosexual material” was finally decriminalized in Pennsylvania after decades of flying under the radar in the state’s crime code.

The bipartisan support for repealing Texas’ sodomy ban is especially unexpected coming from a state whose GOP recently added platform language that referred to homosexuality as an “abnormal lifestyle choice” and continued to keep the state’s main queer conservative organization at more than an arm’s length.

As much as the state’s conservative legislature is in desperate need of critique, any support in striking down this 50-year-old anti-gay law is welcome.