legal bind

Lawyer who called judge a “fat f*g” swears he’s “not a bigot” because he has a gay cousin

A lawyer from Colorado insists he’s “not a bigot” despite calling a judge an antigay slur. Instead, he says, he’s “simply not politically correct.”

Robert Abrams just had his law license suspended and has been ordered to participate in sensitivity training after calling a judge a “gay fat f*g” in an email to two of his clients.

According to court documents, Abrams made the homophobic and fatphobic remarks about Judge Phillip Douglass in an email to a couple he was representing in a construction contract lawsuit.

“The judge hates me,” he wrote. “It happens, it’s not the first time. I probably remind him of someone who beat him up [when he] was a fat kid and now that he’s a big fat judge he gets even w/ the bullies. Maybe he just hates Jews, who knows?”

“While I was getting your case dismissed… I was getting yelled at by Fatso. The judge is a gay, fat, f*g, now it’s out there.”

Related: Ohio judge apologizes for calling gay people “savages” who deserve to die of AIDS

This week, Abrams was issued the three-month suspension after disciplinary judge William Lucero determined he had violated Colorado’s Rules of Professional Conduct.

The suspension was stayed, however, pending the completion of an 18-month probationary period, in which the lawyer must enroll in an ethics school and do eight hours of cultural awareness and sensitivity training.

When asked about his use of the antigay slur, Abrams said he is “simply not a politically correct individual, and will never be politically correct.”

“That’s how the bullies talked to the weaklings when I grew up,” he explained. Then he tried arguing that the word “f*g” describes a “sissy” not a “sex preference.”

Abrams also denied having any “bias against homosexuals,” going so far as to ask his gay cousin to testify about their “warm familial relationship” and citing his work representing a gay bar in Denver one time.

“I’m not a bigot,” he declared.

In his ruling, Lucero wrote that Abrams is free to speak however he wants “in his private life,” but when he’s representing clients he “must put aside the schoolyard code of conduct and adhere to professional standards.”

“[L]awyers’ words and deeds reflect on the values and ideals of today’s legal profession,” Lucero continued. “Lawyers are also officers of the court, so their conduct signals to clients the quality of justice and the measure of fairness that can be expected from the legal system as a whole.”

Abrams says he plans to appeal Lucero’s ruling, calling it “just obnoxiously political correctness.”

Related: Homophobic Lawyer Who Cyberbullied A Gay College Student Loses Again